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State-by-State Effects of a Ruling for the Challengers in King v. Burwell

A map and table showing the number of people now receiving premium subsidies who would lose them if the Court finds for the challengers; the total amount of federal subsidy dollars; the average subsidy (or average premium tax credit) that subsidized enrollees have qualified for; and the average increase in premiums that subsidized enrollees would face if the subsidies are disallowed.

ACA & Federal Taxes Quiz

How much do you know about the Affordable Care Act federal income tax requirements — what the individual mandate means for taxpayers, what penalties may apply, and how those who receive premium subsidies will reconcile the amounts based on actual income? Take this interactive quiz to find out.

Repayments and Refunds: Estimating the Effects of 2014 Premium Tax Credit Reconciliation

This analysis estimates the range of repayment or refund amounts of the advanced premium tax credits issued to enrollees who experience income volatility between the time of enrollment and tax credit reconciliation. Using a simulation model among all households eligible for advance payments of the premium tax credits under the Affordable Care Act, it estimates that half would owe a repayment while 45 percent would be issued a refund of some or all of premium subsidies received.

New Analysis: Half of U.S. Households Eligible for a Tax Subsidy Under the Health Law Would Owe a Repayment, While 45 Percent Would Receive a Refund

Estimated Average Repayment is $794. Estimated Average Refund is $773. Half of U.S. households eligible for a 2014 tax subsidy under the Affordable Care Act would owe a repayment to the government, while 45 percent would receive a refund, according to estimates from a new analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. The…

JAMA Forum: Of SCOTUS and Chicken

Larry Levitt’s March 2015 post explores what could happen if the U.S. Supreme Court rules for the plaintiffs in the King v. Burwell case, the lawsuit that challenges the federal government’s authority to provide financial assistance to people who buy insurance in federally-operated marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act.

Insurance Markets in a Post-King World

This perspective addresses how insurance markets might respond if the US Supreme Court sides with the plaintiffs in the King v. Burwell case. The case challenges the legality of premium and cost-sharing subsidies for low- and middle-income people buying insurance in states where the federal government rather than the state is operating the marketplace under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

New Reports Analyze Cost Sharing in 2015 ACA Marketplace Plans in 37 States

Charts Examine Savings from Subsidies at Stake in U.S. Supreme Court Case Cost-sharing subsidies under the Affordable Care Act can substantially reduce deductibles and other cost sharing for people with low incomes purchasing coverage in the federally-facilitated insurance marketplace serving 37 states, a new analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation…

Cost-Sharing Subsidies in Federal Marketplace Plans

This brief and the accompanying slides examine reduction of cost sharing – deductibles, copayments and coinsurance – in the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) federally-facilitated marketplaces. The analysis shows how cost-sharing subsidies reduce the cost of deductibles, out-of-pocket limits, physician visits, emergency room visits and prescription drug costs in silver plans for low-income people (people whose income is 250 percent of the federal poverty level or below).