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About 9 million people in the United States are covered by both Medicare and Medicaid, including low-income seniors and younger people with disabilities. These dual eligible beneficiaries have complex and often costly health care needs, and have been the focus of many recent initiatives and proposals to improve the coordination of their care aimed at both raising the quality of their care while reducing its costs. This page highlights some key resources examining the dual eligible population and provides you with the standard search result page for a site-wide search on the dual eligible tag.

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Dual Eligibles Tutorial

This tutorial was produced for kaiserEDU.org, a Kaiser Family Foundation website that ceased production in September 2013. The kaiserEDU.org tutorials are no longer being updated but have been made available on kff.org due to demand by professors who are using the tutorials in class assignments. You may search for other tutorials to…

One Year into Duals Demo Enrollment: Early Expectations Meet Reality

One year into initial enrollment in the Medicare-Medicaid financial alignment demonstrations for dual eligible beneficiaries, some initial insights are beginning to emerge. This policy insight highlights key challenges and trends emerging in states’ demonstrations.

Medicaid Managed Care in the Era of Health Reform – Briefing and Panel Discussion

Amid increasing state and national interest in using managed care delivery models for Medicaid beneficiaries, the Kaiser Family Foundation’s Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured (KCMU) hosted a public briefing on Tuesday, June 25, 2013 to provide information on recent transitions from fee-for-service to managed care, and to discuss their…

A Primer on Dually Eligible Beneficiaries

The nine million dually eligible beneficiaries are generally poorer and sicker than other Medicare beneficiaries, tend to use more health care services, and thus account for a disproportionate share of Medicare and Medicaid spending. Because they often have complex medical and long-term care needs, and must navigate both Medicaid and…