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Despite significant successes in addressing HIV/AIDS around the world, including in the United States, many challenges remain—there are more people living with HIV than ever before and millions of new infections each year, and not everyone has access to the care and treatment they need.  At the same time, there have been many successes and new directions ahead.

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1

In what year were the first cases of AIDS reported?

In June 1981, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported the first cases of a rare pneumonia, later determined to be AIDS, in gay men in Los Angeles.

2

How many people are living with HIV/AIDS around the world?

According to the latest estimates available, there were approximately 35 million people living with HIV worldwide as of the end of 2013.

3

Which racial/ethnic group accounts for the greatest number of new HIV infections in the U.S.?

Black Americans have been disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS since the epidemic’s beginning, and that disparity has deepened over time.

4

Approximately how many people with HIV in the U.S. are infected but don't know it yet?

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that about 16% (or, about one in six) of Americans who are HIV positive don’t know their status.

5

According to recommendations issued by the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which of the following groups should get routinely tested for HIV during health care/medical visits?

Since 2006, the CDC has recommended voluntary, routine HIV testing in health care settings for all people ages 13 to 64.

6

Which U.S. government program provides care and treatment for people with HIV/AIDS in the U.S.?

All of the U.S. government programs listed above provide either insurance coverage, care and treatment, and/or other support services for people living with HIV/AIDS who qualify.

7

Which government provides the largest amount of funding to address HIV/AIDS around the world?

The U.S. government was the single largest donor government to HIV/AIDS efforts in 2013.

8

What percentage of the U.S. federal government budget is spent on HIV/AIDS activities?

In Fiscal Year (FY) 2014, U.S. funding for HIV/AIDS programs (domestic and global) was $29.7 billion, representing less than 1% of the federal budget.

9

People from other countries who are HIV positive are not allowed to enter the U.S.

For many years, U.S. law prevented HIV positive travelers and immigrants with HIV from coming into the country (without a special waiver). In 2009, President Obama lifted the final regulatory barriers and the removal of the ban officially began in 2010.

10

Which of the following is NOT a way that a person can become infected with HIV?

HIV is not spread through casual contact like sharing a drinking glass, sitting on a toilet seat, or holding hands.

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HIV/AIDS Quiz

You Answered out of 10 Questions Correctly.

Question

Correct Response

1

In what year were the first cases of AIDS reported?

In June 1981, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported the first cases of a rare pneumonia, later determined to be AIDS, in gay men in Los Angeles.

In June 1981, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported the first cases of a rare pneumonia, later determined to be AIDS, in gay men in Los Angeles. While scientists believe HIV was present before the first cases were brought to the public’s attention, 1981 is generally referred to as the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

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2

How many people are living with HIV/AIDS around the world?

According to the latest estimates available, there were approximately 35 million people living with HIV worldwide as of the end of 2013.

According to the latest estimates available, there were approximately 35 million people living with HIV worldwide as of the end of 2013.

Learn More

3

Which racial/ethnic group accounts for the greatest number of new HIV infections in the U.S.?

Black Americans have been disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS since the epidemic’s beginning, and that disparity has deepened over time.

Black Americans have been disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS since the epidemic’s beginning, and that disparity has deepened over time. Although Blacks represent 12% of the U.S. population, they accounted for 44% of new HIV infections in 2010.

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4

Approximately how many people with HIV in the U.S. are infected but don't know it yet?

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that about 16% (or, about one in six) of Americans who are HIV positive don’t know their status.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that about 16% (or, about one in six) of Americans who are HIV positive don’t know their status.

Learn More

5

According to recommendations issued by the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which of the following groups should get routinely tested for HIV during health care/medical visits?

Since 2006, the CDC has recommended voluntary, routine HIV testing in health care settings for all people ages 13 to 64.

Since 2006, the CDC has recommended voluntary, routine HIV testing in health care settings for all people ages 13 to 64. In addition, CDC recommends more frequent testing for certain groups at higher risk for HIV infection or transmission.

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6

Which U.S. government program provides care and treatment for people with HIV/AIDS in the U.S.?

All of the U.S. government programs listed above provide either insurance coverage, care and treatment, and/or other support services for people living with HIV/AIDS who qualify.

All of the U.S. government programs listed above provide either insurance coverage, care and treatment, and/or other support services for people living with HIV/AIDS who qualify. Additionally, there are other government agencies and programs that provide services to people living with HIV/AIDS, such as the Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS Program (HOPWA) and the Social Security Administration’s income programs for those with HIV/AIDS who are disabled.

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7

Which government provides the largest amount of funding to address HIV/AIDS around the world?

The U.S. government was the single largest donor government to HIV/AIDS efforts in 2013.

The U.S. government was the single largest donor government to HIV/AIDS efforts in 2013. In 2013, disbursements (the actual resources available in a given year) for international HIV/AIDS assistance from donor governments totaled $8.46 billion, of which the U.S. government accounted for approximately two-thirds (66%), followed by the United Kingdom (10%).

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8

What percentage of the U.S. federal government budget is spent on HIV/AIDS activities?

In Fiscal Year (FY) 2014, U.S. funding for HIV/AIDS programs (domestic and global) was $29.7 billion, representing less than 1% of the federal budget.

In Fiscal Year (FY) 2014, U.S. funding for HIV/AIDS programs (domestic and global) was $29.7 billion, representing less than 1% of the federal budget. President Obama’s FY 2015 budget request includes an estimated $30.4 billion, a 2.3% increase over FY 2014.

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9

People from other countries who are HIV positive are not allowed to enter the U.S.

For many years, U.S. law prevented HIV positive travelers and immigrants with HIV from coming into the country (without a special waiver). In 2009, President Obama lifted the final regulatory barriers and the removal of the ban officially began in 2010.

For many years, U.S. law prevented HIV positive travelers and immigrants with HIV from coming into the country (without a special waiver). Steps to end this began in 2008, when the U.S. Congress reauthorized legislation for the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR, the U.S. government’s global HIV/AIDS effort) and ended the statutory HIV travel and immigration ban. In 2009, President Obama lifted the final regulatory barriers and the removal of the ban officially began in 2010.

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10

Which of the following is NOT a way that a person can become infected with HIV?

HIV is not spread through casual contact like sharing a drinking glass, sitting on a toilet seat, or holding hands.

HIV is not spread through casual contact like sharing a drinking glass, sitting on a toilet seat, or holding hands. HIV is primarily spread through unprotected sexual contact and sharing needles with someone who is infected, as certain bodily fluids (semen, vaginal fluids, blood) can contain the virus. Women who are HIV positive can pass HIV to their baby before or during delivery or through breastfeeding.

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