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News Outlets Examine Global Response To HIV/AIDS Ahead Of World AIDS Day

Several news outlets examined the global fight against HIV/AIDS ahead of World AIDS Day (December 1):

  • The Associated Press explores how PEPFAR funds are being used to help connect patients living with the disease to treatment, provide support for families and educate the public about the disease in Vietnam. “The U.S. has spent more than $300 million fighting AIDS in Vietnam, and is now providing AIDS drugs to more than two-thirds of the 32,000 Vietnamese receiving treatment. At $85 million this year alone, PEPFAR accounts for 80 percent of U.S. humanitarian spending in the country,” the news service writes (Stocking, 11/29).
  • Pope Benedict XVI called for prayers and action in the global fight against HIV/AIDS during his weekly Sunday blessing, the AP reports in a second story (11/29).
  • U.S. News & World Report’s “Washington Whispers” blog examines the news Monday that the “Pentagon reports that it has expanded its program to help friendly militaries deal with the issue [of HIV/AIDS] to 80 nations, including India and Russia.” The blog also provides a summary of several military activities planned to mark World AIDS Day (Bedard, 11/25).
  • RTTNews reports the government of China is considering lifting a “two-decade-old ban” that bars foreigners living with HIV/AIDS from entering the country. “The proposed move, which will need the approval of the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, comes as the nation prepares for next year’s Shanghai Expo, which is likely attract four million overseas visitors,” the news service reports (11/30).
  • India’s “Union Health and Family Welfare Ministry, through the National Aids Control Organisation (NACO), will soon roll out free drugs for second-line antiretroviral treatment (ART) of HIV positive children in 10 states,” Indianexpress.com reports. “According to NACO guidelines, only patients who show treatment failure will be put on the second line of drugs,” the news service writes (Shah, 11/28).
  • The Telegraph examines a series of research papers demonstrating the effects of unsafe medical practices on HIV transmission in Africa (Payne/Pflanz, 11/30).