Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

Trending on kff Subsidies Marketplaces Enrollment

National Election Night Survey of Voters, 1994 – Chart Pack

Table 1

Most Important Issue in Deciding 1994 U.S. House Vote Voters Nationwide

VNS Kaiser/Harvard Total Voters Total Voters 1. Health care 1. Health care 2. Crime 2. Crime 3. Econ./jobs 3. Taxes 4. Taxes 4(t). Education 5. Deficit 4(t). Abortion 6. Clinton job 6. Econ./jobs
Source: Voter News Service and Kaiser/Harvard Surveys 1994

Table 2

What Voters See as top priorities for the next President and Congress (1992) and for the next Congress (1994)
1992 — for the next President and Congress 1994 — for the next Congress 1. Economy/jobs 1. Health care 2. Deficit 2. Crime 3. Health care 3. Taxes 4. Taxes 4. Deficit 5. Education 5. Education 6. Foreign policy 6. Economy
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Surveys 1992 and 1994

Table 3

Voters’ views on who should take the lead in developing a Health Care Reform Plan next year

Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in House Voted for
Democrat
in House Members of Congress 56% 70% 45% President Clinton 18% 9% 20% Neither/Other (vol.) 13% 11% 10% Both together (vol.) 8% 2% 13% Don’t know 6% 7% 3%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 4

Change in voter support for Congress enacting a Major Reform of the Health Care System

Compared to six months ago …
Position hasn’t changed … 43%
Less supportive of major reform 31%
Reasons for being less supportive:
The government wouldn’t do it right 49%
The reform alternatives were worse than the way the system is now 19%
Health care reform is too expensive 10%
Less worried about your family’s own health care now 9%
There’s less of a health care crisis now 3%
Other (vol.)/Don’t know 10%
More supportive of major reform 18%
Reasons for being more supportive:
More worried about my family’s own health care now 55%
There’s more of a health care crisis now 31%
Other (vol.)/Don’t know 14%
Don’t know 8%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 5

Voters’ views of what the next Congress should do about Health Care Reform

Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in House Voted for
Democrat
in House Enact a major reform bill 25% 17% 45% Make modest changes in the health care system 41% 46% 28% Leave the health care system alone 25% 31% 14% Other (vol.) 3% 1% 7% Don’t know 5% 5% 6%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 6

Views on whether it’s better to have the Health Insurance System run by the Government or Private Insurance Companies

March 1993 November 1994
Adults Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in house Voted for
Democrat
in house Private insurance companies 39% 55% 66% 33% Government 41% 24% 11% 42% Neither/No difference (vol.) 9% 15% 13% 19% Don’t know 11% 7% 10% 6%
Source: Marttilla & Kiley/Harvard/Robert Wood Johnson Survey 1993
Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 7

What worries the voters most about Health Care Reform if Congress takes action

Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in house Voted for
Democrat
in house There will be too much government bureaucracy 36% 40% 25% The quality of health care for you and your family will not be as good 22% 24% 24% You will not be able to choose the doctor or hospital you want 20% 17% 21% You will have to pay higher taxes 9% 9% 10% None/Other (vol.) 7% 3% 15% Don’t know 6% 8% 5%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 8

Voters’ views on whether the Federal Government or State Governments should take the lead in changing the Health Care System

Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in house Voted for
Democrat
in house State governments 54% 62% 46% Federal government 32% 24% 44% Neither/Other (vol.) 9% 9% 5% Both together (vol.) 3% 2% 1% Don’t know 3% 3% 4%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 9

Voters’ views on what Congress should do about Health Insurance Coverage

Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in house Voted for
Democrat
in house Guarantee health insurance coverage for all Americans 38% 26% 52% Make a start by covering some groups who do not have health insurance 36% 45% 33% Don’t try to see that more people have health insurance 20% 21% 12% Other (vol.)/Don’t know 6% 9% 3%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 10

Voters’ views about which group should be covered first if we cannot provide Health Insurance to all

Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in house Voted for
Democrat
in house Children 40% 37% 38% Working people who are currently uninsured 24% 27% 18% People who need long-term care 12% 17% 10% All low-income people 9% 5% 17% Other (vol.) 3% 2% 5% None (vol.) 3% 3% 1% Don’t know 10% 9% 12%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 11

Voters’ views on which way of improving the Private Health Insurance System is most important for Congress to enact

Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in house Voted for
Democrat
in house Require every employer who offers health insurance to provide a choice of at least three health insurance plans 29% 31% 21% Require every employer to contribute part of the cost of health insurance for all of their employees 27% 26% 31% Outlaw pre-existing condition clauses 18% 18% 18% Require every employer to make health insurance available to all of their employees, without requiring that the employer contribute part of the cost 15% 10% 19% Other/None (vol.) 3% 4% 3% Don’t know 9% 12% 8%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 12

Voters’ willingness to pay more in premiums or taxes to guarantee Health Insurance Coverage for all Americans

Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in house Voted for
Democrat
in house Would personally be willing to pay more, either in higher health insurance premiums or higher taxes 51% 43% 69% Would not be willing 39% 48% 22% Don’t know 9% 9% 8%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 13

What voters see as top priorities for the next Congress

Total Voters
1. Health care
2. Crime
3. Taxes
4. Deficit
5. Education
6. Economy
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 15

Voter support for 25 selected policies to reduce the Federal Deficit

% of voters who favor the proposal
Total Voters Voted for
Republican
in house Voted for
Democrat
in house
STRONG TO MODERATE SUPPORT

Having people over age 65 who earn more than $50,000 a year pay more for Medicare than other seniors 71% 69% 73%
Decrease spending on food stamps 55% 60% 54%
Decrease agricultural price supports 53% 50% 56%
Decrease defense spending 53% 40% 64%
MODERATE OPPOSITION

Paying doctors and hospitals less for the care they provide to seniors under Medicare 48% 44% 55%
Decrease spending on public housing 45% 50% 43%
Decrease spending on unemployment compensation 43% 44% 42%
Increase the proportion of Social Security benefits subject to federal income taxes 42% 40% 47%
Decrease federal aid to cities 39% 47% 33%
Decrease spending on AFDC 39% 49% 27%
Increase the retirement age for Social Security from 65 to 67 39% 44% 28%
Increase Social Security or employer taxes 35% 27% 44%
Limiting the tax deduction for employers’ contributions to their employees’ health insurance 32% 38% 27%
Requiring people to pay a larger share of nursing home costs before federal assistance begins 32% 38% 24%
STRONG OPPOSITION

Decrease or eliminate tax deduction for charitable giving 29% 29% 29%
Decrease or eliminate tax deduction for home mortgages 27% 32% 24%
Reduce the annual cost of living increase in Social Security 26% 34% 18%
Decrease federal aid for college student loans 24% 26% 22%
Increase the federal income tax 23% 20% 31%
Increase taxes on gasoline and heating oil 20% 15% 25%
Decrease federal aid to education 19% 18% 21%
Decrease spending on Social Security 17% 21% 13%
Decrease spending on Medicaid for the poor 17% 17% 15%
Decrease spending on Medicare for the elderly 8% 5% 10%
Decrease veterans’ benefits 7% 8% 8%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Table 16

Voters’ preferences on spending cuts after being told that one in three dollars spent by Federal Government go to Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid
In order to reduce the federal deficit, the biggest spending cuts should come in areas other than Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid 65%
In order to reduce the federal deficit, the biggest spending cuts should come in Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid 10%
We should leave the federal deficit alone and not make major spending cuts in either area 12%
Don’t know 13%
Source: Kaiser/Harvard Survey 1994

Return to top

National Election Night Survey of Voters
Press Release Survey