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Clinton Discusses Global HIV Efforts With South African Officials During 11-Day African Tour

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Tuesday visited officials in South Africa and discussed the response to HIV/AIDS, the Associated Press/Huffington Post reports. Speaking with Foreign Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane “in the second cabinet-level strategic dialogue between the two nations,” Clinton said “that global efforts to stop the virus ‘have saved hundreds of thousands of lives,’” the news service writes. “In South Africa, 5.7 million people — 17.8 percent of the population — have tested positive for HIV,” and PEPFAR “has spent $3.2 billion on antiretroviral drugs and HIV prevention programs in [the country] since 2004,” according to the AP.

International Community Must Redouble Efforts To Ensure 'Many' AIDS-Free Generations

A Lancet editorial discusses the agenda of the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) in Washington last month and asks how the success of the conference will be judged at the XX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), to be held in Melbourne, Australia. “The return of the conference to the U.S. after 22 years, [was not only] a focus for celebration, but also provided a platform for vocal objection to the ban on injecting drug users and sex workers from entering the U.S.,” the editorial states, adding that “the absence of these groups from the meeting is rightly seen by many as a hindrance to developing approaches to combat the epidemic in regions where the disease is concentrated in these populations.”

U.N. Calls For More Aid To Reach 2.5M People Affected By Conflict In Syria

“Some 2.5 million people face destitution in Syria as fighting grows ever more intense in populated areas, the United Nations top relief official said [Thursday], calling on the Government and donors to facilitate more aid through non-governmental organizations (NGOs) on the ground,” the U.N. News Centre reports. Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos “reported that over a million people have been uprooted and face destitution, and that perhaps a million more have urgent humanitarian needs due to the widening impact of the crisis on the economy and people’s livelihoods,” the news service writes (8/16). “‘Their needs for health care, shelter, food, water and sanitation are growing,’ Amos said,” according to Reuters. “The U.N. and its partners are reaching more people with emergency aid every month. But we are only meeting some of the needs,” she added, the news service notes (8/16).

Lack Of Legislative Action Heading Into Congressional Recess Could Impact Global Health Funding

“With Congress adjourned until after Labor Day and not a single funding bill for the federal fiscal year beginning October signed into law before the recess even began, the virtual standstill of legislative action could have a mixed impact on global health funding,” the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog reports. “It appears that House and Senate leaders have reached a tentative agreement to fund most government programs under a so-called ‘continuing resolution’ that would essentially continue funding for most programs at current levels through March 30, 2013,” the blog writes, adding, “PEPFAR is likely to see at least a modest cut from current funding so that resolution could delay or potentially reduce the overall hit to the program” (Lubinski , 8/10).

World Needs A Business Plan To End AIDS

In this post in Global Post’s “Global Pulse” blog, Mitchell Warren, executive director of AVAC, and Chris Collins, vice president and director of public policy at amfAR, write that “the world needs a business plan to end AIDS.” They continue, “To us, ending the epidemic means drastically reducing new HIV infections, while preserving the health of everyone living with HIV,” adding, “This is an ambitious vision, and it is achievable if we make smart use of the HIV prevention and treatment options available today, while continuing the search for a vaccine and a cure. It will require clear priorities, ambitious and achievable targets, sustained funding and effective ways to hold ourselves accountable for progress.”

U.N. To Allocate $55M In Response To 'Neglected Humanitarian Emergencies' In 8 Countries

“The United Nations [on Thursday] announced that it will allocate $55 million to bolster operations in eight countries with neglected humanitarian emergencies,” the U.N. News Centre reports, adding, “Afghanistan, Cameroon, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Madagascar, Sri Lanka and Sudan will all receive funds from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) to help provide food, water, health and other basic services.” According to the news service, “[t]he new allocations will bring the total amount allocated by CERF to more than $158 million this year, as 13 countries were given nearly $104 million in January” (8/9). “‘These CERF grants provide critical funding. The money will save lives by helping aid agencies reach people in desperate need,’ said the Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos said in a news release,” Nigeria’s “Leadership” writes (Oluwarotimi, 8/10). According to the Devex “Development Newswire,” Amos “hopes the funding will serve to ‘draw’ the world’s attention to the situation of people in the chosen countries, as ‘millions more people are still in need’” (Ravelo, 8/10).

Global Alliance Aims To Protect Those At Risk From Toxic Pollutants

“A global alliance to protect the world’s people from toxic lead, chromium, mercury, pesticides and other pollution has been formed by the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, U.N. agencies, donor countries, foundations and non-government experts in July,” freelance journalist Ben Barber reports in this post in Huffington Post’s “Green” blog. “The Global Alliance for Health and Pollution (GAHP) aims to work together to protect the health of over one hundred million people in poor countries who are at risk from toxic pollution,” Barber writes, adding, “The group will work with governments to clean-up toxic hotspots where children, especially, are being poisoned. It could also respond to emergencies such as a recent lead poisoning outbreak in Nigeria that killed hundreds of children” (8/10).

World Leaders, Athletes Gather For 'Hunger Summit' At Conclusion Of Olympic Games In London

As the 2012 Olympic Games drew to a close in London on Sunday, world leaders and athletes gathered for a hunger summit at 10 Downing St., sponsored by U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron, Al Jazeera reports (8/12). The “summit brought together leaders from Brazil, Kenya, Bangladesh, India and Ireland,” the Associated Press notes (8/12). “This meeting … hopes to draw the media spotlight toward the nearly one billion people worldwide who suffer from hunger and malnutrition,” the Examiner writes (Lambers, 8/10). “The U.K. hopes to get commitments from other world leaders, and multinational firms to help prevent 25 million children aged under five suffering stunted growth by the time of the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,” according to International Business Times TV (Salter, 8/13). The country “hopes to use its presidency of the G8 group of wealthy nations, starting next year, to build international support for action to prevent millions of deaths a year due to malnutrition,” BBC News writes (8/12).