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WHO’s Updated Malaria Guidelines Include Rapid Diagnosis, New ACT

The WHO on Tuesday released new guidelines for the treatment of malaria, which recommend “parasitological testing before treatment begins” and add “a new artemisinin based combination treatment [ACT] to the list of prescribed drugs,” BMJ News reports. According to BMJ News, WHO’s guidelines are “expected to enhance earlier and accurate diagnosis, halt the emergence of drug resistance, and reduce the use of unnecessary treatment” (Zarocostas, 3/9).

Also In Global Health News: TB In Papua New Guinea; Plasmodium Vivax Malaria Vaccine; Drugs For Chagas, Leishmaniasis; Pakistan Aid Concerns; HIV Among Pregnant Women In SA

Officials Highlight TB Control Concerns In Papua New Guinea Three years into Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) five-year $19 million tuberculosis control plan, program funders and local health authorities are expressing concerns about its progress, IRIN reports. “In comparison with other countries … coverage of treatment in PNG is lagging behind,” said Marcela Rojo,…

Also In Global Health News: Canada’s Maternal Health Initiative; Mobile Giving; Interview With UNICEF Chief; Burning Biofuels And Anemia; ARVs In India

Sub-Saharan Africa To Receive Boost From Maternal, Child Health Initiative Canada will announce Monday “the 10 countries that will get help from the government’s $1.1-billion maternal and child health initiative,” 80 percent of which is slated for sub-Saharan Africa, the Postmedia News/Vancouver Sun reports. The majority of the money will go to…

Sanofi Pasteur’s Dengue Vaccine Enters Phase III Trial In Australia

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of the pharmaceutical group Sanofi-Aventis, on Thursday announced the company had begun testing its dengue fever vaccine in a Phase III clinical trial in Australia, Dow Jones/Wall Street Journal reports. “Sanofi-Aventis already performed earlier clinical tests on children and adults with the vaccine in the U.S., Asia and Latin America,” Dow Jones/Wall Street Journal adds (Landauro, 11/4).

Guardian’s Katine Project Coverage Concludes

The Guardian concluded its three-year Katine project in north-eastern Uganda, which “tracked the implementation of a development project focusing on five aspects of deprivation: health, education, water and sanitation, livelihoods and governance,” the newspaper writes. Together with the help of Barclays, Guardian readers, Amref and CARE International, the newspaper covered “an extraordinary picture of the ups and downs, strains and stresses of a development project” (Bunting, 10/30).

One-Third Of Malaria-Endemic Countries Are Complying With WHO Malaria Drug Efficacy Monitoring Standards, Report Says

Thirty-four percent of malaria-endemic countries are complying with WHO guidelines to monitor artemisinin resistance within their borders, the agency said in a report on Thursday, CBS News reports (11/18). Reuters reports that artemisinin “is the best drug available against malaria, especially when used in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT), which combines it with other drugs that finish off the [malaria] parasite” (Nebehay, 11/18).

Malaria Drug Artesunate Found More Effective Than Quinine At Preventing Severe Falciparum Malaria Deaths In Children, Study Says

Researchers found that the death rate among children diagnosed with severe falciparum malaria was almost one-fourth lower when they received the drug artesunate rather than the standard treatment of quinine, according to research which was presented at the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene over the weekend and published Monday in the Lancet, HealthDay News/U.S. News and World Report writes. The results have the potential to change the WHO’s malaria treatment recommendations for children, according to the article (11/6).