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Mauritian Official Warns Of Counterfeit Medicine Dangers

Speaking Wednesday at a seminar titled “Campaign Against Counterfeit Medicines,” Mauritian Health and Quality of Life Minister Lormus Bundhoo “cautioned against the dangers posed by counterfeit drugs and their impact on human life” and “said that the authorities are determined to raise awareness on the dangers of the manufacture of and trade in counterfeit medicines, and the importance of combating counterfeit medicines in Mauritius,” PANA/Afriquejet reports. “The minister recalled that Mauritius had set up a National Pharmacovigilance Committee for drug surveillance and drug use in the public and private sectors since December 2011,” the news service writes, noting, “So far, there has been no evidence of counterfeit drugs in Mauritius, he stressed.” The news service provides some statistics about counterfeit drugs worldwide that were cited by Charges d’Affaires Troy Fitrell of the U.S. Embassy in Port-Louis, who also spoke at the event (8/29).

India's Contribution To Global Health R&D Needs Domestic, International Support

As the BRIC countries — Brazil, Russia, India, and China — invest more in innovations in health technologies and other areas, “many are looking to these countries to correct the global health research and development (R&D) imbalance that leaves the poor without needed products such as an improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccine or tests to help diagnose patients in remote rural settings,” David de Ferranti, president of Results for Development Institute (R4D), writes in the Huffington Post Blog. Writing that “India, which has already played such an important role in manufacturing affordable antiretroviral drugs, vaccines, and other essential health commodities for developing countries,” de Ferranti asks whether India “is … ready to play a leading role in health R&D?”

Proposed U.S. Legislation Would 'Set The Standard' For Global Efforts To Combat Counterfeit Drugs

In this Forbes opinion piece, John Lechleiter, president and chief executive officer of Eli Lilly and Company, examines the business of counterfeit medicines, writing, “With global sales last year estimated as high as $200 billion, counterfeit medicine is big business, and it’s growing.” “In a recent Forbes column, Henry I. Miller cited an estimate by Roger Bate of the American Enterprise Institute that more than 100,000 people die every year from counterfeit drugs,” he continues, adding, “That’s why fighting counterfeits is essential to safeguarding health. We need action — national and international — to better secure the pharmaceutical supply chain.”

Panel Discussion Looks Back On AIDS 2012, Explores Possible Topics For AIDS 2014

Devex reports on a panel discussion held in Washington, D.C. Wednesday during which experts “looked back at the main surprises of the just-concluded [XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012)], and offered predictions on what the 2014 follow-up [in Melbourne, Australia] will focus on.” The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and the Kaiser Family Foundation convened the panel, which discussed, among other things, the so-called “cure agenda” and how it might feature in Melbourne, according to Devex. Chris Beyrer, president-elect of the International AIDS Society, which organizes the biannual event, noted that AIDS 2014 might place more focus on human rights and governance issues, according to the news service, which adds Greg Millet, senior policy adviser in the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, pointed out that HIV prevalence among men is higher in countries that criminalize homosexuality. “Holding the conference in Australia should increase participation by Asian countries, said J. Stephen Morrison, senior vice president and director of the Global Health Policy Center” at CSIS, Devex writes (Brookland, 8/2). Jennifer Kates, director of global health and HIV policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation, and David Brown, staff writer at the Washington Post, also participated as panelists, according to the CSIS event page (8/3).

Gilead Sciences Signs Deals With 3 Indian Pharmaceutical Companies To Promote Low-Cost HIV Drugs In Developing Countries

Gilead Sciences Inc. announced Thursday that it plans to partner with Mylan Inc., Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd. and Strides Arcolab Ltd. “to promote access to high-quality, low-cost generic versions of Gilead’s HIV medicine emtricitabine in developing countries,” the Wall Street Journal reports (Stevenson, 8/2). Gilead signed deals with the three Indian companies “to drive sales and reduce manufacturing costs of low-cost generic versions of its HIV drug emtricitabine in developing countries,” Reuters reports, noting that under the deals, Gilead “will provide technology and funding to help reduce manufacturing costs of the drug, the companies said” (Kuber, 8/2).

Drug Companies Developing Novel Treatments For MDR-TB

With incentives to find new antibiotics signed into U.S. law last month, “multiple players are vying for the lead in the [multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)] drug development niche,” Nature Medicine reports. “The fifth reauthorization of the U.S. Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA), signed into law on 9 July, includes a subsection called the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now (GAIN) Act that aims to spur development of antibiotics for drug-resistant bacteria, including MDR-TB,” the news service writes, noting, “Drug makers that ask for approval of medicines to treat these pathogens will receive priority review, as well as five additional years of market exclusivity and fast-track status.” Currently, MDR-TB treatment “involves a bevy of regular tuberculosis medicines that, in many cases, must be administered for as long as two years or more … [and] don’t always work,” Nature Medicine states, adding, “The hope is that new medicines will shorten treatment times and improve cure rates.” The article discusses several medicines that are in different phases of research (Willyard, 8/6).

Study Finds 'Inconclusive' Evidence To Support Use Of WHO-Backed Drug To Prevent Hemorrhage During Labor

According to a study published Monday in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, “[t]he World Health Organization [WHO] should review its approval of a drug used to prevent life-threatening bleeding in women in childbirth because there is not enough evidence that it is effective,” Reuters reports. The study finds that “the evidence to support the use of misoprostol is ‘at best inconclusive,’ yet it is increasingly used in poorer countries to prevent postpartum hemorrhage (PPH),” the news service writes, noting “researchers analyzed 172 previous studies on the use of misoprostol during labor and found that only six had enough information to say whether or not the drug was effective in preventing PPH in rural and community settings in poor countries” (Kelland, 8/20).

International Community Must Redouble Efforts To Ensure 'Many' AIDS-Free Generations

A Lancet editorial discusses the agenda of the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) in Washington last month and asks how the success of the conference will be judged at the XX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), to be held in Melbourne, Australia. “The return of the conference to the U.S. after 22 years, [was not only] a focus for celebration, but also provided a platform for vocal objection to the ban on injecting drug users and sex workers from entering the U.S.,” the editorial states, adding that “the absence of these groups from the meeting is rightly seen by many as a hindrance to developing approaches to combat the epidemic in regions where the disease is concentrated in these populations.”

Interview Examines Issues Surrounding Collaborative R&D To Advance Health Technologies

In this post in the Results for Development Institute’s “Center for Global Health R&D Policy Assessment” blog, Hassan Masum, a consultant at the institute, interviews Alph Bingham, co-founder of Innocentive, an online platform for crowdsourcing technical solutions, about issues surrounding collaborative research and development (R&D) to advance health technologies. According to the blog, the interview is part of a series examining “how collaborative R&D can advance health technologies, and how its success can be gauged” (8/23).

Blog Calls On Presidential Candidates To Discuss Global Health R&D

Noting “Mitt Romney will become the official nominee for the Republican Party at its convention in Florida” this week, Kim Lufkin, communications officer for the Global Health Technologies Coalition, writes in this post in the coalition’s “Breakthroughs” blog, “Science and research will likely not appear on the agenda, as Romney, expected Vice Presidential candidate Paul Ryan, and others will instead focus on topics like reducing federal spending.” She continues, “It’s unfortunate that research will not be a part of the conversation, as new predictions coming out this week indicate that if Romney and Ryan win the election in November, changes could be coming for health research and efforts to develop much-needed new tools for global health.” She concludes, “It’s important that the candidates — from Obama and Vice President Biden to Romney and Ryan — start talking about these issues head-on,” and “no matter which party takes the White House in November, support for global health [research and development (R&D)] must continue” (8/24).