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The Medicaid Resource Book

This reference book describes four pivotal aspects of how the Medicaid program operates — who it covers, what it covers, how it is financed, and how it is administered. It was written to assist the public and policymakers in understanding the structure and operation of the Medicaid program.

Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports: Key Considerations for Successful Transitions from Fee-For-Service to Capitated Managed Care Programs

Although relatively few Medicaid beneficiaries are in capitated managed long-term services and supports (LTSS) programs, significant expansion is anticipated as more than half of states are implementing or proposing new programs that would include a transition from fee-for-service (FFS) to capitated managed care in the LTSS delivery system. By definition,…

Faces of Medicaid

Faces of Medicaid Medicaid, the public program that provides health and long-term care coverage for low-income individuals and families, covers about 60 million people currently, or 1 in 5 Americans. Medicaid beneficiaries include pregnant women, children and families, individuals with disabilities, and seniors. During down economies, Medicaid places pressure on…

The Growth of Managed Care: Are Women Getting What They Need?

How the Changing Health Care Marketplace Affects Coverage and Access to Reproductive Health A fact sheet, Q&A and resource list prepared for a media briefing held in New York on March 27, 1996. The purpose of the briefing was to respond to questions about how reproductive health services are currently…

Poor People Have the Same Needs as Others

Drew Altman, President and CEO of the Foundation, was asked to contribute to the New York Times’ Room for Debate discussion on More Medicaid, More Health? In his piece, Dr. Altman concludes “Insurance — public or private — provides financial protection and access to medical care which low-income people need just as everybody else does. But it cannot by itself change behavior, alleviate poverty, or guarantee that the medical system is doing all it can to improve health.”