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Quantifying Tax Credits for People Now Buying Insurance on Their Own

This analysis estimates that Americans currently buying insurance on the individual market would receive $2700 in subsidies (as tax credits) in 2014 under Obamacare. Tax credits are available for qualifying people buying insurance through the new health care marketplaces, or exchanges.

An Early Look at Premiums and Insurer Participation in Health Insurance Marketplaces, 2014

The analysis compares the premiums in the largest cities in each of the 17 states plus DC for individuals and families in different circumstances to illustrate the insurance rates they might pay, with and without the tax credits created under the law to make coverage more affordable. The 17 states plus DC include eleven operating their own marketplaces (also called exchanges) and seven that have defaulted to the federal government.

State-by-State Estimates of the Number of People Eligible for Premium Tax Credits Under the Affordable Care Act

Key provisions of the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) create new Marketplaces for people who purchase insurance directly and provide new premium tax credits to help people with low or moderate incomes afford that coverage. This analysis estimates that about 17 million people who are now uninsured or who buy insurance on their own (“nongroup purchasers”) will be eligible for premium tax credits in 2014. This issue brief provides national and state estimates for tax credit eligibility for people in these groups.

Interactive: A State-by-State Look at How the Uninsured Fare Under the ACA

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes coverage options for people across the income spectrum, but there are big differences in eligibility for coverage depending on whether a state expands Medicaid or not. This interactive provides a state-by-state look at how many currently uninsured people are estimated to be eligible for Medicaid or tax credits, or in the coverage gap.

How Much Financial Assistance Are People Receiving Under the Affordable Care Act?

This analysis examines the amount of financial assistance that people have qualified for through premium tax credits in the new health insurance marketplaces (also known as exchanges) under the Affordable Care Act through the end of February 2014. The brief also examines the implications that the enrollment variation carries for the potential tax benefits the Affordable Care Act offers to state residents.

The Stakes Beyond the Halbig Lawsuit

In a column for The Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank, Drew Altman discusses if the legal court cases about whether the government can provide tax credits to people in the Affordable Care Act’s federal health exchanges will be perceived by the American people as a legitimate legal question or as more inside-Washington politics.

The Potential Side Effects of Halbig

The Halbig case, if it prevails, would have far-reaching side effects on the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate and the functioning of the individual insurance market.

Obamacare and You: If You Are Uninsured…

The Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, creates several new ways to get health coverage. This fact sheet explains how If you are uninsured and not offered health coverage through your job, you may be able to obtain coverage through Medicaid or through a new health insurance marketplace (or exchange) in your state. It is from our Obamacare & You series.

Obamacare and You: If You Are Low-Income and May Qualify for Medicaid…

This fact sheet from the Obamacare & You series explains health coverage options that may be available to people who have low-incomes or may be qualified for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, The law expands Medicaid and creates creates new private insurance marketplaces, in which subsidies will be available to low- and moderate-income people.