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The Cost of the Individual Mandate Penalty for the Remaining Uninsured

This analysis provides estimates of the share of uninsured people eligible to enroll in the Affordable Care Act marketplaces who will be subject to the individual mandate penalty, and how those penalties are increasing for 2016. It also provides estimates of the number of people who could have a zero-dollar contribution or pay less for health insurance than the penalty, due to premium subsidies, and the number of people who would pay more for a health plan than for their penalty.

Cost-Sharing Subsidies in Federal Marketplace Plans, 2016

This brief and the accompanying slides examine reduction of cost sharing – deductibles, copayments and coinsurance – in the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) federally-facilitated marketplaces in 2016. The analysis shows how cost-sharing subsidies reduce the cost of deductibles, out-of-pocket limits, physician visits, emergency room visits and prescription drug costs in silver plans for low-income people (people whose income is 250 percent of the federal poverty level or below).

Analysis of 2016 Premium Changes in the Affordable Care Act’s Health Insurance Marketplaces

The chart and tables below present an updated analysis of changes in premiums for the lowest- and second-lowest cost silver Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace plans in major cities in 48 states and the District of Columbia, where we were able to find complete data on rates for all insurers. This page will be updated as complete rate information becomes available for more states. More background can be found in our earlier analysis of 2016 rates.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Late June 2015 – A Special Focus On The Supreme Court Decision

The latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that when told that the U.S. Supreme Court ruled to keep the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as it is, allowing subsidies to be provided to low- and moderate-income people in all states regardless of who runs their Marketplace, about 6 in 10 say they approve of the decision while about a third disapprove. The King v. Burwell ruling does not appear to have had an immediate effect on the public’s overall views of the health law. Still, most Americans do not think the ACA has cleared its last big hurdle with the June 25 Supreme Court ruling; just 18 percent think the King v. Burwell case was the last major battle over the ACA, while nearly 8 in 10 think there will be more to come.