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Where are States Today? Medicaid and CHIP Eligibility Levels for Children and Non-Disabled Adults as of April 1, 2014

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) creates new coverage options through Medicaid and new health insurance exchange marketplaces that, taken together, provide assistance to individuals with family incomes up to 400% of the federal poverty level (FPL). The ACA calls for the expansion of Medicaid eligibility to 138% FPL ($15,856 for an individual or $26,951 for a family of three in 2013) in 2014, which would make millions of adults newly eligible for the program. However, this expansion was effectively made a state option by the Supreme Court. If a state does not expand Medicaid, low-income uninsured adults in that state will not gain that new coverage option and will likely remain uninsured. This brief provides an overview of current Medicaid and CHIP eligibility levels for non-disabled children and adults to provide better insight into the impact of the Medicaid expansion.

CHIP Enrollment Snapshot: December 2013

This report focuses on changes in monthly CHIP enrollment between December 2012 and December 2013. This is a long standing report that collects monthly CHIP enrollment data for December (and June, not reported here) going back to 2000. While the data provided in this report are not directly comparable to the data released by CMS, they provide context for the preliminary data released by CMS, illustrating historical trends in CHIP enrollment.

Medicaid Enrollment Snapshot: December 2013

This report focuses on changes in monthly Medicaid enrollment between December 2012 and December 2013. This is a long standing report series that collects monthly Medicaid enrollment data for December (and June, not reported here) going back to 2000. While the most recent data included in this report predate preliminary data released by CMS that show the early effects of full implementation of the ACA, this report series is an important source of historical trend data that provides the necessary context to understand these new sources of Medicaid enrollment data. In addition to providing historical trends, these data also provide more detail about enrollment, such as the distribution of the enrollment among children, adults,or the elderly and people with disabilities, as well as Medicaid enrollment trends for each of these groups.

A Closer Look at the Impact of State Decisions Not to Expand Medicaid on Coverage for Uninsured Adults

The Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion is a core component of the Affordable Care Act, designed to fill longstanding gaps in health coverage for adults. However, in states that do not implement the Medicaid expansion, millions of low-income adults that could have gained Medicaid will remain ineligible for the program. This fact sheet discusses the impact of state decisions not to expand Medicaid on health coverage for uninsured adults in states that are not currently implementing the ACA Medicaid expansion.

Health Coverage and Care in the South: A Chartbook

The South has faced longstanding disparities in health and health care, although significant variation exists between southern states. As a group, compared to those in other regions, Southerners are more likely to be uninsured, less likely to have access to needed health services, and more likely to experience a number of chronic health conditions. This chartbook provides key data on the demographic and economic characteristics of the southern population as well as their health status, health insurance coverage, and access to care today.

New York Times Upshot/Kaiser Family Foundation Polls in Four Southern States

With the end of the initial open enrollment period for new insurance options under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), The New York Times Upshot/Kaiser Family Foundation Polls In Four Southern States examines public opinion on the health care law and the upcoming midterm election in Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, and North Carolina. These…

How Will the Uninsured Fare Under the Affordable Care Act?

This report explains how the ACA expands coverage nationally, including a breakdown of how many uninsured people are eligible for Medicaid, how many are eligible for financial assistance to help them buy private insurance in the new Marketplace and how many will not receive any financial assistance at all. The report also details, in specific dollar figures, the income levels at which people are eligible for Medicaid or financial assistance in the Marketplace. For states not expanding Medicaid, the report quantifies how many uninsured people fall into the “coverage gap,” meaning they will be ineligible for financial assistance in the Marketplace or for Medicaid in their state despite having an income below the federal poverty level.

The Coverage Gap: Uninsured Poor Adults in States that Do Not Expand Medicaid

The expansion of Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) fills in historical gaps in coverage for adults and is a key piece of the continuum of new coverage options. However, in states that do not expand Medicaid, nearly five million poor uninsured adults have incomes above Medicaid eligibility levels but below poverty and may fall into a “coverage gap” of earning too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to qualify for Marketplace premium tax credits.

Kaiser Health Policy News Index: March 2014

The Kaiser Health Policy News Index is designed to help journalists and policymakers understand which health policy-related news stories Americans are paying attention to, and what the public understands about health policy issues covered in the news. This month’s Index finds that the public followed the missing Malaysia Airlines flight and the conflict between Ukraine and Russia more closely than news about ACA enrollment. Additionally, many Americans remain unaware of the status of Medicaid expansion in their own states.