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The Affordable Care Act’s Impact on Medicaid Eligibility, Enrollment, and Benefits for People with Disabilities

Medicaid is an important source of health insurance coverage for people with disabilities. This issue brief explains how Medicaid eligibility and benefits for people with disabilities are affected by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) rules as of 2014. Marketplace rules are discussed to the extent that they relate to Medicaid eligibility determinations for people with disabilities.

The Coverage Gap: Uninsured Poor Adults in States that Do Not Expand Medicaid

The expansion of Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) fills in historical gaps in coverage for adults and is a key piece of the continuum of new coverage options. However, in states that do not expand Medicaid, nearly five million poor uninsured adults have incomes above Medicaid eligibility levels but below poverty and may fall into a “coverage gap” of earning too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to qualify for Marketplace premium tax credits.

Where are States Today? Medicaid and CHIP Eligibility Levels for Children and Non-Disabled Adults as of January 1, 2014

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) creates new coverage options through Medicaid and new health insurance exchange marketplaces that, taken together, provide assistance to individuals with family incomes up to 400% of the federal poverty level (FPL). The ACA calls for the expansion of Medicaid eligibility to 138% FPL ($15,856 for an individual or $26,951 for a family of three in 2013) in 2014, which would make millions of adults newly eligible for the program. However, this expansion was effectively made a state option by the Supreme Court. If a state does not expand Medicaid, low-income uninsured adults in that state will not gain that new coverage option and will likely remain uninsured. This brief provides an overview of current Medicaid and CHIP eligibility levels for non-disabled children and adults to provide better insight into the impact of the Medicaid expansion.

An Introduction to Medicaid and CHIP Eligibility and Enrollment Performance Measures

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently established 12 new Medicaid and CHIP eligibility and enrollment performance indicators for states to report beginning in October 2013. These indicators provide insight into the performance of new eligibility and enrollment policies established under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In December 2013, CMS released initial reports for a subset of the indicators. This brief provides an overview of the new performance indicators; the initial data; and the opportunities and challenges associated with reporting, analyzing, and interpreting the data.

A Closer Look at The Uninsured Eligible for Medicaid and CHIP

This brief provides a closer look at the child and adult uninsured population eligible for Medicaid coverage under current and new ACA rules and identifies key differences between states moving forward with the expansion and those not moving forward at this time

Interactive: A State-by-State Look at How the Uninsured Fare Under the ACA

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes coverage options for people across the income spectrum, but there are big differences in eligibility for coverage depending on whether a state expands Medicaid or not. This interactive provides a state-by-state look at how many currently uninsured people are estimated to be eligible for Medicaid or tax credits, or in the coverage gap.

The Impact of the Coverage Gap in States not Expanding Medicaid by Race and Ethnicity

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) expansion of Medicaid to adults with incomes at or below 138% of the federal poverty level (FPL) effectively became a state option following the Supreme Court decision, creating a “coverage gap” for many poor uninsured adults in states that do not expand Medicaid. This brief examines this coverage gap by race and ethnicity.

Getting into Gear for 2014: Shifting New Medicaid Eligibility and Enrollment Policies into Drive

On January 1, 2014, many key provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will start to go into effect, including the expansion of Medicaid to low-income adults and the launch of new Medicaid eligibility and enrollment processes, which are designed to move toward a coordinated enrollment system across health coverage programs, including Medicaid, CHIP, and the new Health Insurance Marketplaces. Over the past year, states have made steady and significant progress preparing for these changes, but readiness varies considerably as 2014 nears, and implementation work and ongoing process improvements will continue into the foreseeable future. To provide greater insight into the status of implementation, this report provides an overview of key state Medicaid eligibility and enrollment policies slated to go into effect based on data released by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

Fast Track to Coverage: Facilitating Enrollment of Eligible People into the Medicaid Expansion

To help states launch the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion and efficiently enroll eligible individuals, CMS has offered states a series of facilitated enrollment options. These options include strategies, referred to as “fast track enrollment” in this issue brief, that allow states to enroll eligible individuals into coverage using data already available from their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance programs (SNAP) and/or their Medicaid or Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) programs for children. This issue brief provides an overview of the new “fast track” enrollment options, including how they have been implemented, their impacts, and key lessons learned. It is based on a series of interviews with state officials in Arkansas, Illinois, Oregon and West Virginia conducted by Manatt Health Solutions and the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured in October 2013.