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The Medicare Part D Coverage Gap: Costs and Consequences in 2007

This study quantifies the number of Medicare Part D plan enrollees in 2007 who reached a gap in their prescription drug coverage known as the “doughnut hole,” as well as the changes in beneficiaries’ use of medications and out-of-pocket spending after they reached that gap.

2014 Employer Health Benefits Survey

This annual Employer Health Benefits Survey (EHBS) provides a detailed look at trends in employer-sponsored health coverage, including premiums, employee contributions, cost-sharing provisions, and other relevant information. The 2014 EHBS survey finds average family health premiums rose 3 percent in 2014, relatively modest growth by historical standards.

Community Health Centers: A 2012 Profile and Spotlight on Implications of State Medicaid Expansion Decisions

Community health centers are an integral part of the health care safety-net, providing access to care for over 21 million people in the U.S. The ACA made a major investment in the health center program, and expanded health coverage will provide new revenues to health centers, permitting grant funding to support care of the uninsured to go further. This annual update provides a pre-ACA snapshot of community health centers and also examines newly reported data on “look-alike” health centers. In addition, the brief highlights significant differences between the profiles and revenue situations of health centers in Medicaid expansion and non-expansion states in 2012, before the ACA coverage expansions took effect. Finally, it considers financial challenges facing health centers and the implications of state Medicaid decisions for health centers and their capacity to ensure access to care for low-income communities they serve.

Potential Supreme Court Decision: Who Will Bear the Coverage “Burdens?”

The Supreme Court is expected to reach a decision by the end of June, 2014 on the cases brought forth by Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties, two for profit corporations challenging the ACA’s contraceptive coverage requirement. The plaintiffs contend that the requirement that they include coverage for certain contraceptive services (emergency contraceptive pills and intrauterine devices) in the insurance plans “substantially burdens” both the corporation’s and the owners’ religious rights. During the arguments, several of the justices discussed the extent to which the corporations did or not did not have a choice in offering coverage to their workers. In this brief, we explore some of the factors influencing coverage decisions and possible consequences for women and employers given possible Supreme Court decision options: either upholding the contraceptive coverage requirement, or in favor of Hobby Lobby.

Advancing Opportunities, Assessing Challenges: Key Themes from a Roundtable Discussion of Health Care and Health Equity in the South

This brief summarizes the primary themes expressed by participants of a roundtable discussion of current and future opportunities and challenges for advancing health care and health equity in the South organized by Kaiser Family Foundation’s Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured and the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Issue Brief Explores Consequences of Potential Supreme Court Decisions on the ACA Contraceptive Coverage Requirement

A new Kaiser Family Foundation issue brief explores some of the factors influencing employers’ coverage decisions and possible consequences for employers and workers that could arise from possible Supreme Court decisions in the cases brought by Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties, for-profit corporations challenging the Affordable Care Act’s requirement…

Medicaid Spending Growth in the Great Recession and Its Aftermath, FY 2007-2012

This report presents data on changes in Medicaid’s enrollment and spending between federal fiscal year 2007 and federal fiscal year 2012, a period which includes the worst economic downturn in the United States since the Great Depression. The paper also examines what factors drove Medicaid spending over the period, and concludes that overall spending growth from 2007 to 2012 was driven largely by the enrollment growth that resulted from many people losing jobs and income during the recession. However, on a per enrollee basis, Medicaid spending has grown more slowly than other sectors of the health system.