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Examining Private Exchanges in the Employer-Sponsored Insurance Market

This report examines the private health exchange market and its emerging trends and implications as private exchanges gain popularity among employers and health plans. With the potential to reshape the employer-sponsored health insurance landscape, the quickly emerging private exchange market carries important implications for both employers and consumers.

Health and Access to Care and Coverage for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Individuals in the U.S.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals often face challenges and barriers to accessing needed health services and, as a result, can experience worse health outcomes. Recent policy changes have the potential to impact how LGBT individuals access and receive health care. This issue brief examines population characteristics of the LGBT community including demographics, health challenges such as chronic conditions, HIV/AIDS epidemic and STIs, mental health and substance use, sexual and physical violence, adolescent and young adult health, and access to care and insurance coverage. Additionally, this brief examines the impacts of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the recent Supreme Court rulings on the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and how these policy changes will impact insurance coverage and access to health care services.

Interactive: A State-by-State Look at How the Uninsured Fare Under the ACA

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes coverage options for people across the income spectrum, but there are big differences in eligibility for coverage depending on whether a state expands Medicaid or not. This interactive provides a state-by-state look at how many uninsured prior to the ACA coverage expansions are estimated to be eligible for Medicaid or tax credits, or in the coverage gap.

Data Note: How Many People Have Nongroup Health Insurance?

The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has focused attention on the composition of the nongroup market: how it looked before the new regulatory provisions take effect and how it will change afterwards. There are several ways of answering this question, depending on the time period for measuring enrollment and the information source. There is substantial turnover among people with nongroup coverage, which means that the number of people covered at the beginning of a year (or at any other point in time) is quite different than the number of people who keep that coverage throughout the whole year.

Medical Debt Among People With Health Insurance

This report examines the causes and contributors to medical debt, medical bankruptcy, and other difficulties with medical bills among people with insurance. Through in-depth interviews of nearly two-dozen people and quantitative analysis of national survey data, the authors of this report find that in-network and out-of-net-work cost sharing primarily contribute to medical debt among the insured.

All Eyes on the Supreme Court: More than Birth Control at Stake

On March 25th, the Supreme Court will hear two cases brought by for-profit corporations challenging the ACA’s contraceptive coverage rule on religious grounds. These two corporations are Hobby Lobby, a national chain of craft stores owned by a Christian family and Conestoga Wood Specialties, a cabinet manufacturer, owned by a Mennonite family. Beyond the impact on the ACA and contraceptive coverage, the Court’s decision may have implications for religious rights of employers and employees, as well as corporate and civil rights laws. This brief examines three fundamental questions raised by some of the 84 amicus briefs that have been submitted to the Court.

As the Economy Improves, the Number of Uninsured Is Falling But Not Because of a Rebound in Employer Sponsored Insurance

Insurance coverage has rebounded since the end of the Great Recession, mostly because of increases in Medicaid coverage. Employer coverage stabilized after the recession, but mostly because of policies allowing young adults to stay on parents’ coverage. For other age groups, employer coverage rates are still falling. Ongoing shifts in employment status, industry type, income, demographics, and region have affected changes in coverage nationally.