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Medicaid Expansion in Red States

In this column for The Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank, Drew Altman explains that Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision on Medicaid expansion via the Affordable Care Act is the latest sign of pragmatism slowly winning over ideology in red states.

Issue Brief Looks At Experiences of People with HIV With Health Coverage Under the ACA

A new Kaiser Family Foundation issue brief examines the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on people with HIV in five states – California, Florida, Georgia, New York and Texas. Findings are drawn from focus groups in which participants discussed their experiences during the first year of the ACA’s major…

Proposed Medicaid Expansion in Utah

This fact sheet provides a summary of the proposal to expand Medicaid in Utah. This has not been officially submitted to CMS and needs state legislative approval before it could be implemented.

Medigap Enrollment Among New Medicare Beneficiaries: How Many 65-Year Olds Enroll In Plans With First-Dollar Coverage?

On March 26, 2015, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 2, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, which would replace the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula, among other changes; the bill is currently pending in the U.S. Senate. H.R. 2 includes a provision that would prohibit Medicare supplemental insurance (Medigap) policies from covering the Part B deductible for people who become eligible for Medicare on or after January 1, 2020. This data note looks at the number and share of “new” Medicare beneficiaries who would be affected by the Medigap provision in H.R. 2, if it had been implemented in 2010, using the most current data sources available, and examines trends in Medigap enrollment among new beneficiaries since 2000.

The Ryan White Program and Insurance Purchasing in the ACA Era: An Early Look at Five States

This issue brief examines the role that the Ryan White Program has played in helping HIV positive clients purchase insurance coverage from both a historical and an Affordable Care Act (ACA) era perspective. The ACA era analysis focuses on activities in five states during the first open enrollment period and looks specifically at insurance purchasing through the health insurance marketplaces. The states analyzed are California, Florida, Georgia, New York, and Texas.

Medigap and the Medicare “Doc Fix”

The House-passed legislation to repeal the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) includes a provision that would prohibit Medicare supplemental insurance (Medigap) policies from covering the Part B deductible for people who become eligible for Medicare beginning in 2020. A new Kaiser Family Foundation Data Note explores the implications of this…

Health Insurance Coverage in 2013: Gains in Public Coverage Continue to Offset Loss of Private Insurance

The recession accelerated the long-standing decline in employer-sponsored health insurance and through 2013 most of the recovery in the uninsured rate was due to increased enrollment in public insurance, primarily Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). With the exception of young adults ages 19 to 25, who are able to remain on their parents’ health plan until age 26 under the ACA, ESI coverage rates for adults and children continued to decrease between 2010 and 2013.

The Coverage Gap: Uninsured Poor Adults in States that Do Not Expand Medicaid – An Update

In states that do not implement the Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many adults will fall into a “coverage gap” of earning too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to qualify for Marketplace premium tax credits. Nationwide, over three million poor uninsured adults are in this situation. This brief presents estimates of the number of people in non-expansion states who could have been reached by Medicaid but instead fall into the coverage gap, describes who they are, and discusses the implications of them being left out of ACA coverage expansions.