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The Impact of the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP): What Does the Research Tell Us?

The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) was established in 1997 to provide coverage for uninsured children who are low-income but above the threshold for Medicaid eligibility. In 2009, and again in the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Congress extended federal funding for CHIP, but funding will expire a little over a year from now. Decisions about CHIP’s future funding will be consequential as more than 8 million low-income children were covered by CHIP at some point during 2012. To help inform the policy debate about CHIP, this brief reviews key data and evidence from the large body of research on the impact of children’s coverage.

Children’s Health Coverage – What You Need To Know

On Monday, July 14, 2014, the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Alliance for Health Reform will host a briefing to discuss CHIP, and why it was created, as well as experiences with children’s coverage through CHIP and Medicaid, and some of the key policy and financing questions around children’s health coverage looking forward.

CHIP Enrollment Snapshot: December 2013

This report focuses on changes in monthly CHIP enrollment between December 2012 and December 2013. This is a long standing report that collects monthly CHIP enrollment data for December (and June, not reported here) going back to 2000. While the data provided in this report are not directly comparable to the data released by CMS, they provide context for the preliminary data released by CMS, illustrating historical trends in CHIP enrollment.

Health Coverage and Care for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System: The Role of Medicaid and CHIP

This brief provides an overview of the health and mental health needs of girls and boys in the juvenile justice system and the role of Medicaid and CHIP in addressing those needs. It focuses on the circumstances of youth who are placed in juvenile justice residential facilities, the discontinuity of Medicaid coverage for those youth, and the options for improving coverage, continuity of care and access to needed services post-discharge, including new opportunities provided by the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Children’s Health Coverage: Medicaid, CHIP and the ACA

This brief provides an overview of children’s coverage leading up to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a review of changes for children included in the ACA, and a look at issues leading up to the reauthorization of the CHIP program.

CHIP Enrollment: June 2013 Data Snapshot

This issue brief provides state level CHIP enrollment data, adding the June 2013 period. In June 2013, over 5.7 million children were enrolled in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP.) Enrollment in June 2013 increased by 190,453 or by 3.4 percent, compared to one year earlier. Since 2009, annual rates of growth have remained fairly steady, ranging between 3.2 percent and 3.8 percent. In contrast, during the height of the Great Recession, enrollment increased annually by 7.8 to 10 percent. Overall, CHIP enrollment continued to increase, but growth slow to the lowest rates since the start of the Recession as the economic conditions continued to improve. CHIP programs, along with state Medicaid programs continue to play a critical role in assuring health coverage for uninsured children.

CHIP Enrollment: June 2012 Data Snapshot

This issue brief updates monthly enrollment data for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) across all 50 states and DC to include June 2012 data.

Aligning Eligibility for Children: Moving the Stairstep Kids to Medicaid

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires that Medicaid cover children with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) ($31,322 for a family of four in 2013) as of January 2014. Today, there are “stairstep” eligibility rules for children. States must cover children under the age of six in families with income of at least 133 percent of the FPL in Medicaid while older children and teens with incomes above 100 percent of the FPL may be covered in separate state Children’s Health Insurance Programs (CHIP) or Medicaid at state option. While many states already cover children in Medicaid with income up to 133 percent FPL, due to the change in law, 21 states needed to transition some children from CHIP to Medicaid. This brief examines how the transition of children from CHIP to Medicaid will affect children and families as well as states. The brief also looks to New York and Colorado for lessons learned from the early transition of coverage.

What is Medicaid’s Impact on Access to Care, Health Outcomes, and Quality of Care? Setting the Record Straight on the Evidence

Medicaid now covers more than 1 in every 5 Americans, and millions of uninsured individuals will become newly eligible for Medicaid under the ACA. Considering Medicaid’s large and growing coverage role, an evidence-based assessment of the program’s impact on access to care, health outcomes, and quality of care is of major interest. This brief takes a look at what the research literature shows regarding the difference Medicaid makes.

Getting to Zero: Saving Children’s Lives with Vaccines

As one of the cornerstones of global health, widespread immunization through vaccines is critical to reducing child mortality and eradicating polio, two goals endorsed by the international community and particularly emphasized by the U.S. government. This live, interactive webcast explores the importance of vaccines in global child survival efforts, including the role of the U.S. government, the GAVI Alliance, and NGOs. Panelists discuss the current state of childhood immunization, global investments in vaccines, and the opportunities and challenges faced by key stakeholders. This webcast is part of “U.S. Global Health Policy: In Focus”, a Kaiser Family Foundation studio webcast series devoted to discussing current and critical issues facing the U.S.