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Blogs Address Maternal, Newborn Health Issues

In recognition of Mother’s Day, celebrated Sunday, as well as the release of Save the Children’s annual “State of the World’s Mothers” report, the following is a summary of blog posts addressing maternal and newborn health issues.

  • Gary Darmstadt, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog: “We have the opportunity to save millions of lives if the global community comes together on behalf of mothers and newborns,” Darmstadt, head of the Family Health Division of the foundation, writes. “This report gives us hope that it is possible to give a newborn a better chance of survival,” he states, adding, “The release of this report and this information is monumental, considering that a decade ago we barely understood the causes of newborn mortality and were intimidated by what was perceived to be a need for highly specialized care for a newborn” (5/7).
  • Kathleen Donnelly, USAID’s “IMPACTblog”: “At PATH, we’re dedicated to developing simple, affordable technology to make sure becoming a mother is a time of joy the world over,” Donnelly, head of communications at PATH, writes. She interviews Elizabeth Abu-Haydar, public health specialist with the technology solutions program at PATH “about some of the technologies that hold promise for making childbirth safer” (5/7).
  • Eleni Tsigas, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog: “Preeclampsia is — depending on the country — either the first, second, or third leading complication of pregnancy that causes death — either to the mother or baby,” Tsigas, executive director of the Preeclampsia Foundation, notes. “I frequently talk about the Preeclampsia Foundation’s mission running on two parallel tracks: One track must be focused on what we know today — what must we do better with what we already know?” she writes. “The other track, however has our headlights aimed far ahead, investing in research and envisioning a future where preeclampsia is prevented or at the very least effectively treated with something other than delivery of a preterm baby,” she continues, adding, “We call upon the international community — policymakers, researchers, clinicians and funding organizations — to not settle for incremental solutions” (5/3).