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Also In Global Health News: HIV & TB; ITN Program; DRC’s Health System

HIV-Positive Babies More Likely To Contract Deadly TB If Given BCG

A three-year study in South Africa found that babies who were born HIV-positive had a higher risk of contracting a deadly form of tuberculosis if given the widely used BCG vaccine, the AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports. The study, which was published Wednesday in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, recommends “not vaccinating babies with HIV and delaying vaccination for those babies whose HIV status is unknown,” writes the AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer (7/1).

Research Identifies Why People With HIV Are More Likely To Develop TB

Researchers recently identified why people who have HIV/AIDS are more susceptible to getting tuberculosis, the ANI/Times of India reports. The research, which is published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, explains how HIV interferes with the lungs’ cellular and molecular mechanisms used to fight TB. According to one of the scientists, this new information could lead to the development of new drugs to treat or prevent TB in HIV-positive people (7/1).

VOA News Examines Nothing But Nets Campaign

VOA News examines the U.N. Foundation’s campaign Nothing But Nets that is “devoted entirely to raising money to purchase bed nets.” The “widespread use” of long-lasting, insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) can reduce transmission of malaria by up to 90 percent, VOA News writes. Recently, the campaign partnered with the U.N. High Commission on Refugees to distribute ITNs in refugee camps. In addition, Nothing But Nets “has remained strong, even in a troubled economy,” writes VOA News (Hegg, 6/30).

BMJ Examines Health Care System Of DRC, Estimates Of 1,500 Deaths Daily

British Medical Journal examines how a broken health system is exacerbating the health conditions of vulnerable people living in war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo, leading to the deaths of some 1,500 people per day. The article also explores the recent efforts of the U.N. to make health services in the region free (Zarocostas, 6/30).