Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

Trending on kff Ebola Marketplaces Consumer Resources

US Global Health Policy

  • your selections
Clear Search

Filter Results

date

Tags

  • results
Daily Beast Profiles George W. Bush's Post-Presidency Global Health Work

The Daily Beast’s “U.S. Policy” blog profiles former president George W. Bush’s post-presidency work in global health through the Bush Institute, which “houses a variety of programs under the broad headings of global health, education reform, economic growth, and advancing human freedom, areas that advance Bush’s interests and reflect his presidency.” The blog writes, “Now that he’s been out of the White House for almost four years, [Bush’s] post-presidency is coming into sharper relief, and there’s a lot for his critics to admire.” The blog highlights his recent trips to Africa with wife Laura Bush, during which they focused on efforts to expand cervical and breast cancer detection and treatment (Clift, 7/23).

Secretary Clinton Reaffirms U.S. Commitment To 'AIDS-Free Generation,' Pledges More Than $150M For Global Efforts

In a speech delivered at the XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C. on Monday, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton “underscored the United States’ commitment to achieving an ‘AIDS-free generation’ and announced more than $150 million in additional funding,” Politico reports (Norman, 7/23). “‘I’ve heard a few voices from people raising questions about America’s commitment,’ she said, adding, ‘We will not back off. We will not back down,'” according to The Hill’s “Healthwatch” (Viebeck, 7/23). Of the $150 million pledged, “$80 million will be dedicated towards preventing mother-to-child transmission abroad, with the goal of eliminating it by the year 2015”; “[a]nother $40 million is allotted for voluntary male circumcision in Africa to decrease risk of transmission of the virus”; “an additional $15 million [will] fund research on interventions”; “$20 million [is] to bolster country-led efforts to expand HIV-related services”; and “$2 million [will go] towards civil society groups to reach key populations affected by HIV,” ABC News writes (Duwell, 7/23). “Clinton said she had commissioned [U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador Eric Goosby] to produce a blueprint for the way ahead,” the Guardian notes (Boseley, 7/23). “Goosby’s deadline is the upcoming World AIDS Day, Dec. 1,” Inter Press Service adds (Biron, 7/23).

RECENT RELEASE: Kaiser Health News Interviews White House Senior Policy Advisor Ahead Of AIDS 2012

In this Kaiser Health News interview, KHN contributor Joanne Silberner talks with Gregg Millett, senior policy adviser in the Office of National AIDS Policy, ahead of the XIX International AIDS Conference. According to the transcript, Millett says “the president’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy has improved coordination among federal agencies and that the 2010 [Affordable Care Act] will improve access to care for those living with HIV/AIDS” (7/23). In related news, the White House on Saturday released five fact sheets covering HIV/AIDS prevention, HIV/AIDS treatment, the global AIDS epidemic, the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the U.S., and HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination (7/21).

Associated Press Examines HIV/AIDS In Uganda, Effects Of PEPFAR Funding

The Associated Press on Saturday examined the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Uganda, where “[a] new government report says the prevalence of HIV in this East African nation increased from 6.4 percent in 2004 to 7.3 percent in 2011, a shocking statistic for a country once praised for its global leadership in controlling AIDS.” The news service highlights PEPFAR’s contributions to fighting the epidemic in Uganda, noting that “[a]t least half of the 600,000 Ugandans in need of AIDS treatment are able to access the drugs, mostly through PEPFAR.” According to the AP, “U.S. government officials have been pressing Uganda to devote more resources to AIDS and issues such as maternal health, saying dependency on foreign support is unsustainable in the long term.” On a recent trip to the country, Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.) said meeting patients benefitting from PEPFAR-funded treatment “was confirmation of the fact that United States foreign aid works,” the AP writes (Muhumuza, 7/21).

RECENT RELEASE: Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney Urges Support For Global AIDS Fight

“‘We must overcome the global challenge of AIDS,’ a statement released yesterday from presidential candidate Mitt Romney says,” the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog reports. “He notes that the epidemic is ‘indiscriminate,’ takes ‘young and old,’ ‘leaves women and orphans,’ and often affects ‘those least able to help themselves,'” and “says America must continue to be ‘a beacon of hope for innovative research and support in overcoming the global challenge of AIDS,'” the blog writes (Barton, 7/21).

OPINION: Presidential Campaigns Should Pay More Attention To Global Health As Job Creator

In this post in the Huffington Post’s “Opportunity” blog, Orin Levine, executive director of the International Vaccine Access Center (IVAC), examines “some of the available facts on global health and jobs in swing states and [presents] three reasons why the presidential campaigns should pay more attention to global health than they have so far.” Levine writes, “According to the Duke Global Health Institute, in 2007, global health contributed an estimated 7,000 jobs, more than $500,000,000 in wages and salaries and had an economic impact of $1.7-2.0 billion on the North Carolina economy”; “[n]early one-half of all the funding for global health from [USAID] went to Virginia-based institutions — over $560 million in FY 2011 and 2012 alone,” which “no doubt provide jobs to hundreds of Virginians”; and “U.S. contributions to global health and policies towards regulation, research and investments that build systems in emerging market countries will have a major impact on thousands of jobs” in Pennsylvania, where “Merck, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline and others have major manufacturing, commercial and research presences” (7/20).

U.S. Legislators Appeal To U.N. To Take Greater Role In Addressing Haiti's Cholera Outbreak

“U.S. legislators are appealing to the United Nations to take a greater role in addressing Haiti’s cholera outbreak, now in its third year and which has left thousands dead,” Inter Press Service reports. “In a letter addressed to U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations Susan Rice, 104 U.S. members of Congress urged Rice to help step up U.N. concern over the outbreak,” the news service writes. “‘It is imperative for the U.N. to now act decisively to control the cholera epidemic,’ Representative John Conyers, Jr. [D-Mich.] wrote,” adding, “A failure to act will not only lead to countless more deaths … [but] will pose a permanent public health threat,” IPS notes (Freedman, 7/20).

Weekend Events Discuss AIDS Issues Ahead of International Conference In Washington

Noting U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called for an AIDS-free generation last November in a speech at the National Institutes of Health, GlobalPost’s “Global Pulse” blog reports on a discussion held Saturday at the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS), during which “several AIDS experts and U.S. officials gave their views on what it meant to reach an AIDS-free generation — and when it would happen.” The news service quotes several speakers at the event, including Chris Beyrer, a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health “who has served as a consultant to several U.S. agencies on AIDS issues,” Kevin De Cock, director of the Center for Global Health at the CDC, and event moderator Tom Quinn, the director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health (Donnelly, 7/22).

International AIDS Conference Kicks Off In Washington, D.C.

The XIX International AIDS Conference opened in Washington, D.C., on Sunday and “is expected to draw 25,000 people, including politicians, scientists and activists, as well as some of the estimated 34 million people living with HIV who will tell their stories,” Agence France-Presse reports (Sheridan, 7/22). “Researchers, doctors and patients attending the world’s largest AIDS conference are urging the world’s governments not to cut back on the fight against the epidemic when it is at a turning point,” the Associated Press writes, adding, “There is no cure or vaccine yet, but scientists say they have the tools to finally stem the spread of this intractable virus — largely by using treatment not just to save patients but to make them less infectious, too” (Neergaard, 7/22). “New breakthroughs in research will be announced, as will new efforts by governments and organizations to reduce the spread of HIV, to treat those who have it, and to work, eventually, toward a vaccine and a cure,” the Seattle Times writes (Tate, 7/22). According to the Washington Post’s “Blog Post,” three remaining challenges to be addressed at the conference include: “More research into treatment and prevention, and more ways to deliver treatments”; reaching marginalized populations, such as men who have sex with men and sex workers; and “[i]ncreasing funding for PEPFAR and other anti-AIDS programs” (Khazan, 7/20).

Guardian Examines U.S. Food Aid Program

The Guardian has analyzed “hundreds of food aid contracts awarded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in 2010-11 to show where the money goes,” the newspaper reports. “Two-thirds of food for the billion-dollar U.S. food aid program last year was bought from just three U.S.-based multinationals,” ADM, Cargill, and Bunge, the newspaper notes, adding that “these three agribusinesses sold the U.S. government 1.2 million tons of food, or almost 70 percent of the total bought” (Provost/Lawrence, 7/18). In a separate article, the Guardian writes, “Food aid has also become a valuable business for a variety of smaller food companies,” as well as shipping firms and non-governmental organizations (Provost, 7/19). In an interactive feature, the Guardian “[e]xplore[s] which companies sold food aid products to the government last year, what was bought, and where it was sent” (Provost/Hughes, 7/20). And another article describes how the newspaper analyzed the data (Hughes, 7/19).