Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

Trending on kff Ebola Marketplaces Consumer Resources

US Global Health Policy

  • your selections
Clear Search

Filter Results

date

Tags

  • results
Amending U.S. Farm Bill Could Save Money, Help Food Aid Reach Millions More

In this post in the Huffington Post’s “Impact” blog, Kelly Hauser, agriculture policy manager at ONE, writes that an amendment to the U.S. farm bill “could save money and lives in Africa.” “The farm bill is an unwieldy five-year bill dedicated to shaping the U.S. government’s policies and spending on energy, farm subsidies, food stamps, conservation policies, and international agricultural trade, which includes the largest donor food aid program in the world, known as ‘Food for Peace,'” she writes, adding, “By my back-of-the-envelope calculations, Congress has the opportunity to make changes to the farm bill that would allow U.S. food assistance to reach six million more people with the same amount of funding.”

Congressman 'Dissatisfied' With Handling Of Controversial H5N1 Papers Calls For Cohesive Policy For Handling 'Risky' Research

“[D]issatisfied with the government’s handling of two research papers on mutant forms of avian influenza,” Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wisc.) on Wednesday “said that the lack of a cohesive policy for handling risky research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other federal agencies could necessitate new laws, a situation that researchers have been trying to avoid,” the Nature News Blog reports. “The second of the controversial papers showing that H5N1, or ‘bird flu,’ can spread through the air between mammals was published last week, providing some closure to the months-long debate about the work and whether its publication would result in the proliferation of dangerous viruses and increased risk of an accidental or intentional release,” the blog writes, adding, “Sensenbrenner says not enough work has been done to ensure that such controversies don’t arise again.”

New York Times Magazine Profiles U.S. Secretary Of State Clinton's Tenure

The New York Times Magazine profiles U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her tenure at the State Department. The article begins by describing a partnership she announced in September 2010 with the U.N. Foundation “to provide 100 million cleaner and more efficient stoves around the world by 2020,” and writes that “she has since used every opportunity to implore world leaders to adopt policies to encourage their use.” The article continues, “After three and a half years in office, though, her greatest legacy has been the remaking of American diplomacy in her own fashion, shaped as much by her own personality and fame as by a guiding philosophy.” When asked what she plans to do in retirement, she said “[s]he intends to write another book and to pursue philanthropy, championing women and girls, as ever,” the article states (Myers, 6/27).

Child Survival Call To Action Sign That U.S. Government Looking To Collaborate On Foreign Aid

“The Child Survival Call to Action shows the U.S. government navigating a new approach to global health and development,” Nellie Bristol, global health research fellow at the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS), and Janet Fleischman, senior associate at the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, write in a post on the center’s “Smart Global Health” blog. The summit and its Global Roadmap (.pdf) “illustrate the new approach to foreign aid: collaboration and partnerships, country leadership instead of donor dictates and integration of services instead of a disease specific focus,” the authors write, adding, “They also highlight other new realities in the development arena in that they promise little additional funding and put the onus on the countries themselves to ensure progress.” They conclude, “How momentum from the Call to Action will lead to changes to U.S. global health efforts remains to be seen” (6/26).

U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Reflects On Lessons Learned From PEPFAR's First Decade

In this post in the Department of State’s “DipNote” blog, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador Eric Goosby reflects on his speech at the Brookings Institution on Tuesday in anticipation of the AIDS 2012 conference scheduled to take place in Washington, D.C. from July 22-27. Noting he discussed “some of the lessons learned from the first decade of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) that can inform future efforts on AIDS and global health,” he writes, “The last 10 years have taught us what must be done to end this epidemic and achieve an AIDS-free generation, and I have great hope that we will get it done. This is the moment to seize this hope, and together we will turn the tide” (6/26).

USAID Foreign Assistance Data Available In Online Tool

In a media note, the State Department and USAID announce that “USAID’s foreign assistance obligation and expenditure data is now available on the Foreign Assistance Dashboard (www.foreignassistance.gov).” According to the note, “The Foreign Assistance Dashboard serves as a tool for users to understand the impact of U.S. foreign assistance funding by country, sector, initiative, and agency in an easy-to-understand format. The site provides a visual presentation of foreign assistance data in a standard and user-friendly way, and has become the U.S. Government’s main tool for improving foreign aid transparency.” Data in the tool is from fiscal years 2009 through 2011 and will be updated regularly, the media note states (6/25).

Gates Foundation Blog Highlights Work Of CDC Kenya

In this post in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog, editor Amie Newman, a communications officer at the foundation, highlights the work of “two HIV home-visit health workers who work with the CDC Kenya (Centers for Disease Control) to visit with a family in a remote area in the Nyanza province.” According to the blog, the “center is responsible for most of what goes on when it comes to researching HIV/AIDS in this country: what prevention and treatment methods work, monitoring the number of new HIV/AIDS cases, the number of births, deaths, implementing those treatment and prevention methods (including voluntary medical male circumcision, distribution of condoms, medicine for treatment), and maternal and newborn health issues which are directly connected to HIV (like prevention of mother-to-child transmission)” (6/25).

U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Discusses Lessons Learned From U.S. Response To HIV/AIDS Worldwide

U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador Eric Goosby “discussed lessons learned from the U.S. response to the global HIV/AIDS epidemic over the past decade at an event hosted by the Brookings Institute Monday morning,” the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog reports. “While calling recent scientific advances in HIV prevention ‘game changers’ that have offered hope of an AIDS-free generation, [Goosby said] that the successful fight against the epidemic relies on recognizing AIDS-specific efforts so far as a foundation for further health gains, on country ownership, and on continuing to build ‘the shared responsibility’ of a multi-donor response,” the blog adds.

Event Highlights Impact Of AIDS On Women Worldwide

The Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog summarizes an event held Thursday, titled “AIDS-free Generation? Not Without Women,” that was sponsored by the National Council of Women’s Organizations. The session aimed “to draw attention to pivotal issues surrounding the impact of AIDS on women worldwide” ahead of the International AIDS Conference, the blog states. Speakers at the event included Katherine Fritz, global health director at the International Center for Research on Women, and Serra Sippel, president of the Center for Health And Gender Equity (CHANGE), according to the blog, which notes “CHANGE recently released two reports on the implementation of the Global Health Initiative and reproduction health care in Guatemala and Ethiopia, concluding that GHI principles could be used to enhance services and conditions in both countries” (Barton, 6/22).

U.S. Secretary Of State Clinton Defends Women's Reproductive Rights At Conclusion Of Rio+20 Conference

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton “took a stand for women’s reproductive rights during the Rio+20 United Nations conference on Friday, saying ‘women must be empowered to make decisions on whether and when to have children’ if the world is to attain agreed-upon sustainable development goals,” the Associated Press/ABC News reports. Clinton “spoke during the conference’s last day, applauding the final document’s endorsement of women’s sexual and reproductive health but making it clear that she objected to the omission of specific language on reproductive rights,” the news service writes. “‘While I am very pleased that this year’s outcome document endorses sexual and reproductive health and universal access to family planning, to reach our goals in sustainable development we also have to ensure women’s reproductive rights,’ Clinton said,” according to the AP (Barbassa, 6/22).