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WHO Calls For Emergency Stockpile Of Cholera Vaccine

The World Health Organization (WHO) is calling for the establishment of a global stockpile of the cholera vaccine to respond to outbreaks like the one that has gripped Haiti since an earthquake hit the country in 2010, NPR’s “Shots” reports (Knox, 8/17). “On Thursday, experts meeting in Washington endorsed the use of the vaccine to control the continuing outbreak in Haiti and the Dominican Republic,” the New York Times writes, adding, “Studies conducted by medical charities there showed that up to 90 percent of people who had received one dose of the vaccine returned for a second dose and were therefore protected” (McNeil, 8/17). “The WHO’s technical advisers cited the recent Haiti vaccination project, involving 100,000 people in Port-au-Prince and a rural area, as evidence that cholera vaccination can work in the midst of an outbreak,” “Shots” notes. According to the blog, “the WHO is seeking funds to launch the stockpile, which would initially contain enough doses to vaccinate a million people and cost $10 million a year to maintain” (8/17).

Sierra Leone Declares Cholera Outbreak A National Emergency

“Sierra Leone has declared a cholera outbreak that has left 176 people dead since the start of the year a national humanitarian emergency, officials said Friday,” AlertNet reports, adding, “Jonathan Abass Kamara, public relations officer for Sierra Leone’s health ministry, said the outbreak was the worst in the West Africa country’s history” (Akam, 8/17). “The decision was announced after a meeting between [the] government and officials from the World Health Organization and United Nation’s children agency UNICEF,” Agence France-Press/ReliefWeb writes, noting the government “has also set up a special task force to deal with the epidemic” (8/16).

Blog Interviews Health Reporter Regarding Haiti's Cholera Outbreak

In this post in KPLU 88.5’s “Humanosphere” blog, journalist Tom Murphy interviews reporter Jonathan Katz, “the first to break the story connecting U.N. peacekeepers from Nepal to the” cholera outbreak in Haiti. According to the interview transcript, they discuss Katz’s original reporting, the humanitarian response to the outbreak, and the current state of the outbreak, among other topics (8/16).

U.N. Calls For More Aid To Reach 2.5M People Affected By Conflict In Syria

“Some 2.5 million people face destitution in Syria as fighting grows ever more intense in populated areas, the United Nations top relief official said [Thursday], calling on the Government and donors to facilitate more aid through non-governmental organizations (NGOs) on the ground,” the U.N. News Centre reports. Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos “reported that over a million people have been uprooted and face destitution, and that perhaps a million more have urgent humanitarian needs due to the widening impact of the crisis on the economy and people’s livelihoods,” the news service writes (8/16). “‘Their needs for health care, shelter, food, water and sanitation are growing,’ Amos said,” according to Reuters. “The U.N. and its partners are reaching more people with emergency aid every month. But we are only meeting some of the needs,” she added, the news service notes (8/16).

WFP Begins Series Of Air Drops To Deliver Food To Refugees In South Sudan

“The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) carried out the first in a series of air drops to replenish rapidly diminishing food stocks for more than 100,000 people in South Sudan who have fled fighting in Sudan,” the U.N. News Centre reports (8/15). “The refugees are severely malnourished going for days without supplies after being driven from their homes by the violence,” Examiner.com notes (Lambers, 8/15). “The first air drops were made Wednesday in Maban County in Upper Nile state,” the Associated Press/Washington Post writes, adding that camps there — “along with another in the region called Yida — have received more than 160,000 refugees who have fled war on the other side of the border in Sudan.” According to the AP, “WFP plans to deliver up to 2,000 metric tons of food to Maban over the coming days and weeks” (8/16).

Blog Examines Use Of Controversial HIV Drug In Malawi

This post in the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog examines the use of stavudine, “also known as d4T, an antiretroviral treatment that was dropped in wealthy countries years ago and that the World Health Organization has recommended stop being included in treatment programs,” to treat HIV in Malawi. “[W]hile children and pregnant or breastfeeding women, as well as tuberculosis patients have access to less toxic treatments, stavudine continues to be the first treatment supplied to most Malawi patients under the terms of the country’s grant from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria,” the blog writes, adding, “In a letter [.pdf] to Global Fund General Manager Gabriel Jaramillo and [U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador] Eric Goosby, the Centre for Development of People (CEDEP), Health GAP (Global Access Project), and the Malawi Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (MANET+) are asking the Global Fund to find a way to switch to first line treatment in Malawi that is acceptable to patients and World Health Organization standards” (8/15).

WFP Appeals For $48M In Food Aid For Malawi; Britain Gives $4.7M

“The U.N.’s World Food Programme [WFP] said Tuesday it needs $48 million in food aid for about 11 percent of Malawi’s population who will face hunger due to bad crops,” Agence France-Presse reports. “‘It is estimated that those needing food assistance in the southern African country will rise to 1.6 million people during the peak of the lean season early next year,’ the WFP said in a joint statement with Britain’s Department for International Development (DFID),” the news service writes.

VOA Examines Food Security Situation In Rural Zimbabwe

“The United Nations’ World Food Program [WFP] is appealing for $87 million to avert starvation in Zimbabwe’s rural areas where close to two million people need food aid,” VOA News reports, adding, “The U.N. agency says because of poor rainfall, this year’s hunger season in Zimbabwe has started earlier than in the past.” The news service highlights the “dire food situation” in the rural area of Buhera, part of Manicaland province, which “is one of the four regions the [WFP] says are worst affected by drought in Zimbabwe.” “We hear of people starting to sell their livestock at distress prices, reducing their number of meals in rural Zimbabwe, which is a clear indication that the food security situation is worsening,” Liliana Yovcheva of the WFP program office in Zimbabwe said, according to the news service (8/13).

U.N. To Allocate $55M In Response To 'Neglected Humanitarian Emergencies' In 8 Countries

“The United Nations [on Thursday] announced that it will allocate $55 million to bolster operations in eight countries with neglected humanitarian emergencies,” the U.N. News Centre reports, adding, “Afghanistan, Cameroon, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Madagascar, Sri Lanka and Sudan will all receive funds from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) to help provide food, water, health and other basic services.” According to the news service, “[t]he new allocations will bring the total amount allocated by CERF to more than $158 million this year, as 13 countries were given nearly $104 million in January” (8/9). “‘These CERF grants provide critical funding. The money will save lives by helping aid agencies reach people in desperate need,’ said the Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos said in a news release,” Nigeria’s “Leadership” writes (Oluwarotimi, 8/10). According to the Devex “Development Newswire,” Amos “hopes the funding will serve to ‘draw’ the world’s attention to the situation of people in the chosen countries, as ‘millions more people are still in need'” (Ravelo, 8/10).

NGOs Call For Full Implementation Of Human Right To Water, Sanitation In Letter To U.N. Member States

At the end of last month, the international community commemorated the second anniversary of a July 2010 U.N. General Assembly resolution declaring water and sanitation a basic human right, but “there was hardly any political rejoicing either inside or outside the U.N.,” Inter Press Service/Guardian reports. “In March, [UNICEF] and the [WHO] released a joint report claiming that the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of halving the proportion of people without access to safe drinking water (spelled out under Goal 7 on environmental sustainability) had been reached well in advance of the 2015 deadline,” the news service writes. Though the MDG goal was reached, “[a] cautious UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake warned that victory could not yet be declared since at least 11 percent of the world’s population — roughly 783 million people — are still without access to safe drinking water, and billions are without sanitation facilities,” the news service notes.