Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

Trending on kff Ebola Marketplaces Enrollment

UN Agency

  • your selections
Clear Search

Filter Results

date

Tags

  • results
Over 33M People Worldwide Living With HIV/AIDS, UNAIDS/WHO Report Finds

An estimated 33.4 million people worldwide are living with HIV/AIDS, according to a report released Tuesday in Shanghai by the WHO and UNAIDS that shows “more people are living longer due to the availability of drugs,” Reuters/Washington Post reports (Rujun/Chan, 11/24).

Health Officials Address U.S. H1N1 Vaccine Supply

U.S. health officials briefing Congress on Wednesday would not outline a timeframe for when enough H1N1 (swine flu) vaccines would be available to reach all high-risk populations in the country, the Washington Post reports.

U.N. Agencies Renew Commitment To REACH Initiative To Combat Child Hunger, Malnutrition

“United Nations agencies [on Wednesday] stressed the need to tackle child hunger and undernutrition in the pursuit of sustainable development, highlighting a joint initiative that offers practical and effective approaches to combat this problem in the most affected countries,” the U.N. News Centre reports. “Under the REACH initiative, the World Food Programme (WFP), the U.N. Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have committed to a renewed effort against child hunger and undernutrition,” the news service writes.

Forbes Interviews UNFPA Executive Director Regarding Global Progress In Reducing Maternal Mortality

In this post in the Forbes “Leadership” blog, contributor Rahim Kanani interviews U.N. Population Fund (UNFPA) Executive Director Babatunde Osotimehin about a report titled “Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2010” — released by UNFPA, WHO, UNICEF and the World Bank in May — “which shows that the annual number of women who die in pregnancy or childbirth has dropped from more than 543,000 to 287,000, a decline of 47 percent.” Among other topics, they discuss key findings of the report, highlight which regions of the world made the most progress, and note some of the “most promising interventions to reduce the number of women around the world dying in childbirth” (6/7).

Family Planning Summit Next Month 'Could Mark Turning Point For Maternal Health'

In this post in the Guardian’s “Poverty Matters” blog, U.N. Population Fund (UNFPA) Executive Director Babatunde Osotimehin discusses a family planning summit to be held in London next month, writing the UNFPA “is supporting the initiative so that it can gain traction and support among other donors and UN member countries.” He writes, “More than 200 million women, largely in the least developed countries, want to use modern family planning methods but can’t access them,” and continues, “Enabling women to control the number and spacing of their children is essential to reducing maternal deaths.” The summit, co-hosted by the U.K. government and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, “will be launched to meet this unfilled need for modern family planning in developing countries by tackling the estimated $3.6 billion (£2.3 billion) annual shortfall in investment (.pdf),” he adds.

UNAIDS Director Calls For ARV Production In Africa

“Executive Director of UNAIDS Michel Sidibe Wednesday called for the production of anti-retroviral drugs [ARVs] in Africa to make the life-saving medicines against AIDS accessible to patients and boost the medicines manufacturing sector on the continent,” PANA/AfriqueJet reports. Speaking at the 16th West African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA) Summit in Lome, Togo, “Sidibe said it was time for the continent to negotiate strong partnerships with emerging countries, including India and Brazil, to support the local production of ARVs in Africa,” the news service writes, adding, “According to [Sidibe], Africa accounts for only one percent of the medicine manufacturing sector that is expected to generate as much as $1 trillion by 2015” (6/7).

30th UNAIDS Program Coordinating Board Meeting Concludes In Geneva

“If the vision of zero new HIV infections is to be achieved, a reinvigoration of HIV prevention is urgently needed,” UNAIDS writes in a feature article on its webpage, adding, “This will be most effective if a combination prevention approach is adopted, where multi-faceted and tailored programs are implemented.” The agency writes, “An in-depth exploration of how such an approach can be implemented took place during the thematic session of the 30th UNAIDS Program Coordinating Board (PCB) meeting in Geneva on 6 June” and discusses the session in detail (6/7).

Tackling Diarrhea, Pneumonia Could Save 2M Children, According To UNICEF Report

“Two million of the world’s poorest children could be saved by introducing routine vaccination programs against diarrhea and pneumonia,” according to a new report (.pdf) from UNICEF, BBC News reports (6/8). “Pneumonia and diarrhea account for nearly one-third of the deaths among children under five globally,” the Guardian writes, adding, “Nearly 90 percent of deaths from pneumonia and diarrhea occur in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia” (Tran, 6/8). The report “identifies a tremendous opportunity to narrow the child survival gap both among and within countries by increasing commitment, attention and funding,” according to a press release from UNICEF (6/8).

Joint UNAIDS/UNDP Brief Highlights Potential Impacts Of Free Trade Agreements On Public Health

“A new UNAIDS/UNDP joint issues brief [.pdf] highlights the potential impacts of free trade agreements on public health,” UNAIDS reports in a feature story on its website. “The brief concludes that ‘to retain the benefits of [flexibilities in the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS)], countries at a minimum should avoid entering into free trade agreements that contain obligations that can impact on pharmaceutical price or availability,'” the article states. It adds that “the potential impact of a number of current or planned free trade agreement negotiations taking place across the world — particularly affecting countries in the Asia and the Pacific region — can hinder countries’ rights to implement such flexibilities” (6/1).