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G20 Countries Could Tax Foreign Exchange To Help Achieve U.N. MDGs, Opinion Piece Says

The G20 countries “could help both the poor and the global economy by fully financing lagging efforts to fight poverty and disease worldwide, and the best way to do this would be to impose a very small tax on the prosperous foreign exchange industry,” Philippe Douste-Blazy, a former French foreign minister who is a special adviser to the U.N. secretary general on innovative financing, writes in a New York Times opinion piece.

Also In Global Health News: Malawi HIV/AIDS Fight; Cancer In Developing World

Malawi Gets $30M World Bank Grant For HIV/AIDS Tim Gilbo, the World Bank’s director in Malawi, announced on Tuesday that the organization will grant the country $30 million, which will be used to “increase access to prevention, treatment and mitigation services with a focus on behavioural change,” SAPA/News24.com reports. Gilbo also said the country should “identify and promote those…

Clinton Global Initiative Meeting Begins, Will Address Investment In Women, Girls

The Clinton Global Initiative’s (CGI) 2009 meeting, which begins Tuesday in New York, has added a new theme to its agenda – “investing in women and girls to narrow the gender gap,” Bloomberg reports in an article examining the conference. “In all the world there is only one strategy which clearly slows population growth, raises income and promotes more social stability that is supported across all religious and cultural lines,” former President Clinton said. “And that is putting all the girls in school and giving all the young women access to the labor market.”

TIME Examines Voluntary Airline Tax That Aims To Fund Global Health Projects

TIME examines a voluntary airline tax, to be introduced in the U.S. and several European countries in January, that aims to “make up a shortfall in official government aid to poor countries — a shortfall exacerbated by the world financial crisis.” The tax will be used to combat HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, and it will also go towards improving maternal health and reducing child mortality.

Also In Global Health News: HIV/AIDS In Bangladesh; River Blindness In Tanzania; Potential Immune System Booster; Compounds Might Fight TB

U.S. Commits $13M To Fight HIV/AIDS In Bangladesh BDNews24.com reports on a new $13 million U.S.-government initiative aimed at “providing HIV-prevention services to two million at-risk people in Bangladesh including injecting drug users, male, female and transgender sex workers and their clients, and HIV-positive people through a network of 50…

Financial Times Articles Examine Global Health Issues

The Financial Times’ health section published several global health reports that “focus on the diseases and healthcare issues that affect millions but are often absent from the health debate in rich countries.”

Study Identifies Causes, Rates Of Death Among Young People Worldwide

“Road accidents, pregnancy and childbirth complications, suicide, violence, the AIDS virus and tuberculosis are the biggest killers of young people across the world,” according to a paper published on Friday in the journal Lancet, Reuters reports.

African Health Ministers Adopt Resolutions To Improve Health As WHO Regional Meeting Closes

At the conclusion of the 59th session of the WHO Regional Committee for Africa, African health ministers agreed on four resolutions that aim to improve health on the continent, the Guardian reports. The regional committee adopted resolutions that deal with drug-resistance related to HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria; malaria elimination in Africa; and preparedness and response for the current swine flu pandemic. The fourth resolution deals with establishing high-quality institutions for disease surveillance, food and medicine regulation and other public health-related interventions, according to the Guardian.