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BMJ Examines History, Future Of Global Fund To Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

The BMJ examines the history of fraud allegations against the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the organization’s ongoing reform efforts. “Most observers agree that after a honeymoon first decade, the Global Fund had grown so big, and the economic climate and attitudes to diseases such as AIDS have changed so dramatically, that more rigor and efficiency was needed, fraud or no fraud,” BMJ writes. The Fund is expected to appoint a new director “and a new funding model, to be announced on November 15, [which] are supposed to get things back on track” (Arie, 11/12).

Blog Examines Importance Of Nigeria In Global Health Efforts

“Look in the global strategies for HIV, [tuberculosis (TB)], malaria, maternal and child health, polio eradication, [neglected tropical diseases (NTDs)], and [non-communicable disease (NCDs)] — among many others — and you’ll see Nigeria at or near the top of the ‘Must Win’ countries,” Todd Summers, a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic & International Studies’ (CSIS) Global Health Policy Center, writes in the CSIS “Smart Global Health” blog. “Home to 170 million people, many of them desperately poor, Nigeria carries a huge and disproportionate share of burden for many of the world’s most deadly diseases,” he writes, noting the country, “one of the most important countries for all three diseases, is losing more in revenues than all of the Global Fund’s annual contributions combined.” He continues, “So, somehow, the Nigerian government needs to do a better job of capturing the revenues it’s due, and channeling a greater percentage of that revenue to the urgent health needs of its citizens, but that doesn’t seem to be happening.” However, Summers concludes “there’s some good news to report” on overall governance in the country, and he provides some examples (11/8).

International Community Must Step Up Fight Against TB In Southern African Region

“With $2.5 trillion in mineral reserves, South Africa has the largest mining sector in the world,” but “[t]he work can be devastatingly toxic for the body,” with “inhumane and untenable” working conditions, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, archbishop emeritus of Cape Town, South Africa, writes in a Wall Street Journal opinion piece. “South Africa’s 500,000 mine workers have the highest recorded rate of [tuberculosis (TB)] among any demographic in the world,” he states, noting that cramped working and living conditions put them at an increased risk of the disease. Overall, “mine-associated TB gives rise to 760,000 new cases annually in Africa,” and “costs South Africa alone $886 million each year in health care costs and in impoverishment when family providers are too sick to work, or die,” according to a study conducted by the Southern African Development Community (SADC), Tutu writes. Therefore, the 15 SADC nations this summer pledged to take “concrete steps” to fight the disease, he notes.

USAID Newsletter Focuses On TB

The November 2012 issue of USAID’s “Global Health News” newsletter focuses on tuberculosis (TB). The newsletter features a link to a video titled “Voices of TB,” an infographic (.pdf) on innovations in TB diagnostics, and links to an IMPACTblog piece and a USAID press release discussing TB diagnostics (November 2012).

GlobalPost Interviews Director Of WHO Stop TB Department About Future Of Global Response

In an interview with GlobalPost’s “Global Pulse” blog, Mario Raviglione, director of the WHO’s Stop TB Department, explains “why the fight against [tuberculosis (TB)] is at a crossroads.” Because of advances in diagnostics and treatment, “we have a possibility here of envisioning a much brighter future for TB care and control over the next few decades,” he says, according to the interview transcript. “On the other hand, we have a financial gap that we are estimating at about $3 billion out of the $8 billion that are necessary for care and control efforts in countries, plus another $1.4 billion gap in the area of research,” he continues. According to the transcript, Raviglione addresses “why the funding gap exists, what would help reduce it, and what’s at stake as we choose a path forward” (Judem, 11/1).

USAID To Triple Financial Support For PAHO/WHO Regional TB Program

According to a Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and WHO joint press release, USAID “has tripled its financial support for the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) Regional Tuberculosis Program, which seeks to prevent 15,000 deaths from tuberculosis in Latin America and the Caribbean over the next five years and reduce the incidence of this disease.” The press release notes the commitment “increases a previous $5 million USAID/PAHO agreement, signed in November 2011 to strengthen programs for tuberculosis, maternal and neonatal health, and health systems in the region over the course of a three-year period, to a total of $8.9 million.” The press release states that $5.1 million is earmarked for the tuberculosis program, “up from an originally expected investment of $1.5 million” (10/31).

Resolve To Fight TB Must Be Strengthened In U.S. Global AIDS Blueprint

As part of its “Blueprint” series discussing the creation of a U.S. global AIDS blueprint called for by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in July, the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog features an opinion piece by Salmaan Keshavjee of Harvard Medical School and Partners In Health. With an estimated 1,000 people with HIV dying of tuberculosis (TB) every day, “[i]t is clear that our current approaches to addressing the global tuberculosis pandemic are inadequate,” he writes. Keshavjee says, “First, bold targets for reducing tuberculosis incidence and zero TB-HIV deaths must be prioritized in the blueprint. … Second, known strategies for stopping the spread of tuberculosis have to be actively implemented. … Lastly, any effective strategy has to ensure that HIV advocates at the community level are educated about the threat of tuberculosis,” and he describes each of his points in detail. He concludes, “The United States has shown visionary leadership in the area of HIV treatment and changed the lives of countless people for the better. It is time to take on tuberculosis with the same moral and pragmatic vigor” (Barton, 10/31).

Study Finds Pollution As Dangerous To Health In Developing World As Malaria, TB

“Industrial pollution is putting the health of 125 million people at risk worldwide and is as dangerous in the developing world as malaria or tuberculosis, according to a new report,” titled “2012 World’s Worst Pollution Problems,” Reuters/ABC Science reports (Allen, 10/24). According to the Guardian, the report, published on Tuesday by the Blacksmith Institute in partnership with Green Cross Switzerland, “documents, for the first time, the public health impact of industrial pollutants — lead, mercury, chromium, radionuclides and pesticides — in the air, water and soil of developing countries.”

Communicable Diseases Responsible For Majority Of Deaths In Africa, WHO Official Says

Speaking on Monday in Luanda, Angola, at the opening session of the inaugural meeting on Medical Education, sponsored by the Faculty of Medicine of Agostinho Neto University, WHO Regional Director for Africa Luis Gomes Sambo said communicable diseases account for 63 percent of deaths in Africa, with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) responsible for the majority of those, the Angola Press reports. Nonetheless, Africa has made significant progress against HIV/AIDS and malaria, as well as in improving child and maternal mortality, he said, according to the news service (10/22). Sambo also “said on Monday in Luanda that the population’s health depends on the provision of health care for those [in] need, as well as the efforts made by the society to protect, promote and re-establish the people’s well-being,” another article from Angola Press notes (10/23).

Examining The Need For TB Indicators, Activities In Global AIDS Response Blueprint

In a post in the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog, Lucica Ditiu, executive secretary of the Stop TB Partnership, examines the need to include tuberculosis (TB) in the global AIDS response blueprint that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced at the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012), writing, “At present one in four AIDS-related deaths is precipitated by TB. … All people living with HIV need to get tested for TB and receive TB treatment if they have the disease.” She continues, “We urge PEPFAR to include in the blueprint explicit TB/HIV indicators and activities,” and she provides five examples (10/23).

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