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Recent Releases In Global Health

Factors Contributing to Health Of Women Worldwide: The Kaiser Family Foundation features a narrated slide tutorial by epidemiologist Laurel Spielberg on the health issues facing women around the world. The tutorial touches on issues such as economic status and biological, social, and cultural factors that affect women’s health, as well as…

Recent Releases In Global Health

The Future Of Global Health Journalism: This report for the Kaiser Family Foundation found that shrinking newsroom budgets and the closing of many foreign bureaus are curtailing global health coverage within traditional news media outlets. Advocacy and nongovernmental organizations are increasingly bypassing news outlets and producing their own content, leading to questions…

Also In Global Health News: Zimbabwe’s HIV Prevalence Declines; Sri Lanka Flooding; Online Tool To Track Outbreaks; U.S. Recognition Of S. Sudan; TB In Swaziland

Study Examines Reasons For Zimbabwe’s HIV Prevalence Decline Reuters reports that an article published in PLoS Medicine “said Zimbabwe’s [HIV] epidemic was one of the biggest in the world until the [prevalence of people] infected with HIV almost halved, from 29 percent of the population in 1997 to 16 percent in 2007.”…

Opinions: Global Fund; Accountability For Haiti Aid

Global Fund Saves Lives, ‘Not Expendable’ Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson writes of the “breathless Associated Press story” about the uncovering of some corruption in grants given by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the subsequent reaction: “When scandals fit preexisting ideological narratives, they assume a life…

AP Reports On Global Fund Grant Money Lost To Corruption, Global Fund Responds

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, a “$21.7 billion health fund championed by the rich and famous has come under harsh scrutiny amid revelations it’s bleeding money to corruption,” the Associated Press reports. The piece examines the organization’s response to an article published by the AP on Sunday that highlighted the findings of an internal investigation led by “Robert Appleton, a veteran former U.S. federal prosecutor whom [the fund’s inspector general John] Parsons hired last fall to root out corruption,” the AP writes (Heilprin, 1/24).

Also In Global Health News: Cholera Death In DR; TB Vaccine Study; Rising Food Prices

Dominican Republic Reports Country’s First Cholera Death Following Outbreak In Haiti “Dominican Republic on Sunday confirmed that a 53-year-old Haitian man has become the country’s first death from cholera and announced the immediate start of a broad disease control and monitoring operation” around the eastern town of Higuey where he…

Recent Releases In Global Health

Insecticides To Fight Malaria: In a Daily Caller opinion piece, Richard Tren of Africa Fighting Malaria and Donald Roberts of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences write in support of using insecticides, like DDT, to combat malaria: “Unless the donor nations that fund global malaria programs, such as the…

Lancet World Report Examines Health Risks Associated With Inaccurate TB Tests, WHO’s Upcoming Recommendations

With “scores of commercial serology tests for tuberculosis … being sold in high-burden countries,” the “WHO is due to release a negative policy recommendation – the first of its kind for the organisation” – after several reviews have “indicated poor performance of these tests,” Lancet World Report writes in a piece that documents the health risks associated with a growing number of inaccurate TB tests. However, “[m]anufacturers continue to claim that their tests are effective and fill a diagnostic niche, especially in sputum smear-negative patient groups,” the journal notes.