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Stop TB Partnership, TAG Release Report On Tuberculosis Research Funding

The Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog reports the findings from the second edition of the 2011 Report on Tuberculosis (TB) Research Funding and Trends from 2005-2010, released Thursday by Treatment Action Group (TAG) and the Stop TB Partnership. “TB research and development investment increased 76 percent between 2005 and 2010, but investment has slowed markedly, with only two percent growth since 2009,” the blog notes, adding, “The $630.4 million 2010 investment is only one-third of the $2 billion needed to stay on track with the Global Plan to Stop TB 10-year implementation and research strategy to eliminate TB as a public health threat by 2050” (Mazzotta, 3/28).

Lack Of Aid Money In Haiti Threatening Health, Human Rights Of Displaced People, U.N. Official Warns

“The United Nations warned on Tuesday that a lack of aid money for Haiti was putting hundreds of thousands of displaced people at risk by forcing humanitarian agencies to cut services in one of the world’s poorest countries,” Reuters reports. Noting Haiti only received half of the $382 million aid request in 2011 and so far has received only 10 percent of this year’s $231 million appeal, Nigel Fisher, the U.N. humanitarian coordinator in Haiti, said, “(Underfunding) threatens to reverse gains achieved in the fight against cholera through the promotion of sanitary and hygiene practices. … It threatens the very existence of hundreds of thousands of (displaced people) living in camps,” according to the news agency. “Fisher said the humanitarian community was urgently requesting $53.9 million for the April-June period to protect those living in camps and to continue to provide services such as clean water, food and crime prevention and respond to cholera outbreaks, among other things,” Reuters writes (Nichols, 3/27).

Global Fund’s General Manager Discusses Future Direction, Achievement of Fund In Interview

Gabriel Jaramillo, general manager of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, “has given an interview [.pdf] with the Spanish newspaper El Mundo, in which he outlines the direction and achievements to-date in making the Global Fund a more efficient and successful organization,” according to a Global Fund press release. In the interview, Jaramillo “also stresses the importance of continuing the work of the Global Fund in saving lives through greatly improving the grant management processes and strengthening this function inside the organization,” the press release states (3/28).

Retired Top Military Leaders Advocate For ‘Strong And Effective’ International Affairs Budget In Letter To Congress

“More than 80 retired top military leaders are calling on Congress to support a strong and effective International Affairs Budget and reiterating how critical this funding is to our national security in a letter [.pdf] released by the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition’s (USGLC) National Security Advisory Council (NSAC),” according to a USGLC press release. “The FY 2013 House Budget Resolution being debated this week represents a 11 percent cut to the International Affairs Budget from current year funding, and Members of Congress should heed the advice of our most respected men and women in uniform on why this funding is so important to our national security,” the press release states (Parker, 3/27).

Malaria Funding Has Helped Prevent Nearly 1M Child Deaths Over Past Decade, Study Finds

The results of a study (.pdf) published in Malaria Journal “suggest that funding for malaria prevention in Africa over the past decade has had a substantial impact on decreasing child deaths due to malaria,” according to the study’s abstract. Between 2001 and 2011, malaria prevention intervention scale-up helped prevent an estimated 842,800 malaria-related child deaths, an 8.2 percent decrease over the period had malaria intervention remained unchanged since 2000. The researchers note that 99 percent of the decline can be attributed to the use of insecticide-treated bednets. “Rapidly achieving and then maintaining universal coverage of these interventions should be an urgent priority for malaria control programs in the future,” the study concludes (Eisele et al., 3/28).

CGD Examines House Budget Committee Recommendation To Eliminate Feed The Future

In this post in the Center for Global Development’s (CGD) “Rethinking U.S. Foreign Assistance Blog,” Connie Veillette, director of CGD’s rethinking U.S. foreign assistance initiative, discusses the passage of the House Budget Committee’s “budget alternative last week that calls for reduced spending for international affairs.” “Perhaps the oddest and most counter-productive recommendation is to eliminate Feed the Future but continue U.S. food aid, also known as PL 480, in its stead,” she writes, continuing, “PL 480 is not a long-term program to promote food security. … It is a ‘feed the now’ rather than a ‘feed the future’ approach” (3/26).

World Bank Presidential Nominee Kim Begins 7-Country ‘Listening Tour’ To Promote Candidacy

The White House nominee for president of the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim, on Tuesday begins a seven-country “listening tour” in order “to promote his candidacy with stops in Africa, Asia and Latin America, the Treasury Department announced Monday,” Bloomberg Businessweek reports (Crutsinger, 3/26). According to Reuters, “The Treasury Department said Kim will visit Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as well as Beijing, Tokyo, Seoul, New Delhi, Brasilia and Mexico City between March 27 and April 9 to meet heads of state, finance ministers and others to talk about priorities for the World Bank.”

Health Solutions Developed In Lower-Income Countries Will Help Bring End To Aid

“It is not just quantity of aid that counts nowadays, but the quality and perspective of that aid, as well as innovation, investment and experience domestically,” Jonathan Glennie, a research fellow at the Overseas Development Institute, writes in the Guardian’s “Poverty Matters Blog.” Noting a newly released report from the Global Health Strategies initiatives (GSHi) that says the BRICS nations — Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa — are increasing their global health and development aid, Glennie continues, “Most of the BRICS are still developing countries in the traditional sense of that term, which means that they are combating extreme poverty, hunger and disease at home as well as in their aid programs.” He adds, “This is the main characteristic that sets them apart from traditional donors and philanthropic mega-foundations.”