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Blog Calls On Presidential Candidates To Discuss Global Health R&D

Noting “Mitt Romney will become the official nominee for the Republican Party at its convention in Florida” this week, Kim Lufkin, communications officer for the Global Health Technologies Coalition, writes in this post in the coalition’s “Breakthroughs” blog, “Science and research will likely not appear on the agenda, as Romney, expected Vice Presidential candidate Paul Ryan, and others will instead focus on topics like reducing federal spending.” She continues, “It’s unfortunate that research will not be a part of the conversation, as new predictions coming out this week indicate that if Romney and Ryan win the election in November, changes could be coming for health research and efforts to develop much-needed new tools for global health.” She concludes, “It’s important that the candidates — from Obama and Vice President Biden to Romney and Ryan — start talking about these issues head-on,” and “no matter which party takes the White House in November, support for global health [research and development (R&D)] must continue” (8/24).

IRIN Examines Conditional Cash Transfer Program Aimed At improving Maternal Health In The Philippines

“A nationwide conditional cash transfer program in the Philippines is slowly improving maternal health, but more is needed to reverse the climbing maternal mortality ratio, say women’s groups,” IRIN reports. “Known locally as ‘Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program’ (4Ps), five-year conditional cash transfers (CCTs) were first rolled out in 2007 as a pilot program to cut poverty,” the news service writes, adding, “Now, with a budget of $227 million, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) aims to make CCTs available to 5.2 million eligible households by 2015.”

Researchers, Politicians Gather In London For Global Health Policy Summit

Medical researchers, politicians, and policymakers gathered at a Global Health Policy Summit in London Wednesday “to champion innovative solutions to the world’s major health problems,” Imperial College London reports in an article, which notes the summit, “the first event of its kind, is the result of a partnership between Imperial College London and the Qatar Foundation for education, science and community development” and “will tackle maternal health, primary care, non-infectious diseases and aging societies” (8/1). “This is a unique summit. We’re gathering the global thought leaders, very much to exchange ideas, to learn from each other, when it comes to innovative solutions to the significantly great challenges facing health care systems globally,” summit chair Ara Darzi of the Institute for Global Health Innovation tells BBC Radio correspondent Claudia Hammond in a “Health Check” audio report (8/1).

Blog Examines Preliminary Report On PEPFAR's Pilot Expenditure Analysis Initiative

In this post on the Center for Global Development’s (CGD) “Global Health Policy” blog, CGD’s Victoria Fan, Rachel Silverman, and Amanda Glassman examine “the preliminary report [.pdf] on the pilot of PEPFAR’s Expenditure Analysis Initiative, an important and exciting move by PEPFAR towards evidence-based decision making and greater transparency.” Expenditure analysis (EA) “provides an account of where money gets spent and on what,” they continue, adding, “Here’s why it could be a game changer: This seemingly simple tool is essential for realizing huge potential gains in both technical and allocative efficiency, two core components of value for money.” After describing some of the report’s shortcomings, they write that “the report demonstrates the wide range of potential applications for using EA to improve value for money, which is particularly encouraging given PEPFAR’s plans to institutionalize EA into its routine annual reporting” (8/1).

Examining The Role Of Economists In Global Health

In this post in the Center for Global Development’s (CGD) “Global Health Policy” blog, Amanda Glassman, director of global health policy and a research fellow at the center, reports on the contribution of economists to the global health field, writing, “Economists are not global health’s most popular human resource. … Yet a new view of the contribution of economists to global health is emerging.” She notes, “At the International AIDS Economics Network (IAEN) meeting earlier this month, [U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator] Ambassador Eric Goosby gave a terrific overview of the policy questions that need to be addressed by the field and the role that economists need to play in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the HIV/AIDS response,” and provides a number of quotes from his address (8/1).

Clinton Tours Health Center In Senegal's Capital On First Stop Of 10-Day Africa Trip

On the first stop of a 10-day tour of Africa, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton stopped at the Phillipe Maguilen Senghor Health Center in Dakar, Senegal, where Awa Marie Coll-Seck, the country’s minister of health, “explained to Secretary Clinton how these operational centers dramatically improve maternal and child health,” according to a post in USAID’s “IMPACTblog.” Coll-Seck “also noted that USAID-supported distribution of insecticide impregnated mosquito nets across the country had drastically reduced the incidence of malaria,” according to the blog, which adds that Clinton “was pleased to hear that the United States is playing a key role in helping meet one of its biggest challenges: decentralizing services so they are available at the village level throughout the country.” In an address several hours later, “Clinton invoked the Senghor center … saying she was highly impressed by the integrated nature of the facility” and that “[i]t was a successful model she hoped could be duplicated throughout Senegal and the entire West African region” (Taylor, 8/1).

PEPFAR Announces $60M Initiative To Support Implementation Of Science Research, Evaluation Programs

PEPFAR on Wednesday “announced awards for a $60 million initiative, with potential for additional funding in year three, to support implementation science research and the evaluation of programs established under PEPFAR,” according to a U.S. State Department media note. “These evaluations, funded through collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), will contribute to the evidence base for HIV programs and maximize the impact of its investments in programs around the world. Data gathered will help partner countries to strengthen their efforts to prevent new HIV infections and save lives,” the media note states, adding, “More than 35 evaluations in over 12 countries will be funded in 2012” (8/1).

Financial Times Publishes Special Report Focusing On Global Health Policy Issues

The Financial Times on Wednesday published a special report (.pdf) on global health policy to coincide with the Global Health Policy Summit in London. The special report features 10 articles on a variety of topics, including an article examining the complexities of applying health policies, delivering treatment and measuring program performances on a global level; an article highlighting potential strategies for lowering health care costs globally; and an article discussing the need for innovative approaches to combating infectious diseases (8/1).

Nonsurgical Circumcision Device For Adults To Be Tested In Africa

“PrePex, a bloodless circumcision device for adults, will be tested in at least nine African countries in the next year, according to the backers of the tests,” the New York Times reports. PEPFAR “will pay for PrePex circumcisions for about 2,500 men in Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda, said Dr. Jason B. Reed, a technical adviser to the plan,” the newspaper writes. “The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will pay for similar studies in Kenya, Mozambique, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe,” it adds. According to the New York Times, the device “was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in January, and World Health Organization approval is expected soon.” The newspaper notes, “No surgeon is needed for the procedure; a two-nurse team slides a grooved ring inside the foreskin and guides a rubber band to compress the foreskin in the groove,” and adds, “After a week, the dead foreskin falls off like the stump of a baby’s umbilical cord or can be painlessly clipped off, said Tzameret Fuerst, chief executive of PrePex” (McNeil, 8/13).

U.S. Support Of PEPFAR, Global Fund Helping To Achieve Global AIDS, TB, Malaria Goals

In this post in Huffington Post’s “Impact” blog, Deborah Derrick, president of Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, examines “the success of U.S. efforts to promote better global health through support for [PEPFAR] and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.” She highlights U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s recent trip to Africa, writing that Clinton’s “encouraging words” at the Reach Out Mbuya health center in Uganda reinforced U.S. commitment to an AIDS-free generation. She notes both PEPFAR and the Global Fund have supported the center and adds that “through hundreds of similar local programs all over the world, the Global Fund provides treatment to 3.6 million people who are HIV-positive.”