Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

Trending on kff Ebola Marketplaces Enrollment

Programs, Funding & Financing

  • your selections
Clear Search

Filter Results

date

Tags

  • results
U.S. Investment In Global Health Strengthens Communities, Economies

“It’s time to respond … [to Americans who] have not been given a comprehensive explanation of how U.S. investments in foreign aid — particularly global health — are used or how they benefit Americans here at home,” Karl Hofmann, president and CEO of PSI, writes in a Huffington Post opinion piece. “Global health investments benefit the globe. … Healthy families yield healthy societies and economies. Everyone everywhere benefits,” he states.

Small U.S. Investments In Global Health Help Strengthen Economies

In this Huffington Post opinion piece, singer and actor Mandy Moore writes that during her travels as a PSI ambassador, “sometimes the disconnect I see is truly striking: people can get cold Coca Cola, but far too infrequently malaria drugs; most own mobile phones, but don’t have equal access to pre-natal care.” Noting that technology has helped the U.S. and Europe improve health standards and therefore strengthen their economies, she writes, “It’s simple and logical, but to grow economies, the basic building block of health is necessary.”

U.S. Government Pledges Funding For Maternal Mortality Programs In Zambia, GHI Executive Director Says

“The [U.S.] government has said it is hopeful that Zambia will be able to reduce maternal and child mortality, and has pledged to contribute” millions in funding to programs to help further that goal, the Times of Zambia reports. “Speaking during a meeting between U.S. government officials and the media, Global Health Initiative (GHI) Executive Director Lois Quam pledged her government’s commitment to partnering with the Zambian government in order to address major health concerns in the country,” the newspaper adds.

PEPFAR ART Cost Model Data Presented To PEPFAR Scientific Advisory Board

“For every 1,000 patient-years of PEPFAR-supported HIV treatment provided, 228 fewer HIV patients die, 449 fewer children become orphans, 61 fewer sexual HIV transmissions occur and 26 fewer ‘vertical’ transmissions (e.g. mother-to-child) occur,” John Blanford of the CDC told the PEPFAR Scientific Advisory Board in Washington, D.C., on September 14,…

Foreign Affairs Committee Votes To Prohibit U.S. Funding To U.N. Population Fund

The Republican-led House Committee on Foreign Affairs voted Wednesday to approve a bill that would prohibit the U.S. government from providing funding to the U.N. Population Fund, an organization “that helps women and children in developing countries with reproductive health and family planning,” Agence France-Presse reports (Cassata, 10/5). “House Republicans say they are pushing the legislation because the fund, known as the UNFPA, is complicit in China’s controversial one-child policy, which enforces abortion and sterilization,” the Huffington Post writes (10/5).

Developed Nations Should Adapt Cost-Effective Health Initiatives Pioneered In Developing Countries, Experts Say

“Rich countries that provide wasteful, inefficient, and inequitable health services should be more accountable for the money they spend and should adapt cost-effective models of care pioneered in poor countries, delegates agreed at a meeting” on global health held by the Salzburg Global Seminar and the Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science last week in Hanover, New Hampshire, BMJ News reports. Speaking at the conference, Al Mulley, director of the Dartmouth center, said, “Poor countries have had to innovate to provide essential services, and there is plenty of scope for ‘reverse innovation,'” BMJ writes.

DfID's Reduction In Bilateral AIDS Spending May Increase Need For Funding Later

In a letter to the Guardian in response to the news that the U.K. Department for International Development (DfID) plans to cut bilateral aid for HIV/AIDS by nearly one-third, Nathan Ford, medical coordinator for Medecins Sans Frontieres, writes that the agency’s decision “comes at a critical moment,” after “[v]arious studies published in the past year have shown widespread access to treatment and prevention can dramatically cut HIV/AIDS transmission, and allow for consideration of an end to the epidemic.”

Gates Foundation Accepting Nominations For Vaccine Innovation Award

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation announced on Thursday that “it is accepting nominations for the first Gates Vaccine Innovation Award to recognize, celebrate, and spur transformative ideas for achieving impact through the delivery of vaccines,” according to a Gates Foundation press release. The winner of the award, which was announced…

Momentum Builds For Reform In U.S. Foreign Aid, One Of Our 'Most Effective' Investments

In this Global Health Magazine opinion piece, Aaron Emmel, senior policy advisor at PATH, examines a momentum for reform in foreign aid that “has been mounting in both Congress and the Administration,” writing, “Now we face one of the most austere budget environments in our nation’s history, making the need for an efficient, accountable, transparent, effective, and strategic foreign assistance policy all the more important. Clearly, foreign aid needs to be reformed so that it can do the job it was originally intended for: assisting the people who need it most in the most efficient and effective way possible.”

Researchers Issue Warning Of Health Crisis In Greece Amid Country's Financial Crisis

“Economically vulnerable Greeks are losing health care access amid dwindling budgets, facing higher risks of HIV infection and sexually transmitted diseases, and in some cases, even dying, according to a study released online Monday by The Lancet,” the Associated Press/ABC News reports (Torchia, 10/10). “There were about 40 percent cuts in hospital budgets, understaffing, reported occasional shortage of medical supplies, and bribes given to medical staff to jump queues in overstretched hospitals,” the authors wrote, according to BBC News. “At the same time there was a 24 percent increase in public hospital admissions, partly fuelled by fewer patients using private hospitals,” BBC writes (Gallagher, 10/9).