Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

Trending on kff Ebola Marketplaces Enrollment

Private Sector Involvement

  • your selections
Clear Search

Filter Results

date

Tags

  • results
Much Work Remains To Be Done In Fight Against Malaria

Positive results announced this week from a large clinical trial testing the efficacy of the RTS,S malaria vaccine are “encouraging,” but they are also “a reminder of how much work remains to be done,” an Economist editorial reports. The WHO abandoned its first efforts to eradicate the disease 14 years after setting out to do so in 1955, but “a new wave of enthusiasm,” beginning in 1998 with the establishment of the Roll Back Malaria partnership and culminating with Bill Gates’s call for malaria eradication four years ago, “has helped to lower the number of malaria deaths by 20 percent over the past decade,” the editorial states.

Kaiser Family Foundation Report Examines Innovative Financing Mechanisms For Global Health

A new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation, titled “Innovative Financing Mechanisms for Global Health: Overview and Considerations for U.S. Government Participation,” “examines some of the most prominent new financing mechanisms for global health across a broad range of categories, with particular attention to the current level of U.S. government involvement,”…

USAID, Kimberly-Clark Announce Partnership To Improve Maternal, Child Health In Andean Region

USAID and Kimberly-Clark Corporation, a manufacturer of health and hygiene products, on Tuesday announced “they will work together to improve maternal and child health in the Andean region, starting in Colombia and Ecuador,” according to a USAID press release. Combining the U.S. government’s Global Health and Feed the Future initiatives…

VOA News Examines How A Public-Private Partnership Will Combat Cancer Among Women In The Developing World

This VOA News editorial examines how a public-private partnership between PEPFAR, the George W. Bush Institute, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, as well as private sector partners will launch a program called Pink Ribbon, Red Ribbon to “combat cervical and breast cancer for women in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.” “In the developing world, women’s cancers are often neglected and associated with stigma that discourages women from seeing a doctor,” VOA writes. The editorial quotes Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton who said, “If we want to make progress on some of the toughest challenges we face in global health — fighting HIV, preventing childhood deaths, improving nutrition, stopping malaria, and more — then investing in women must be at the top of the agenda” (10/11).

Huffington Post Profiles UNITAID Chair

The Huffington Post profiles Philippe Douste-Blazy, U.N. under-secretary-general of Innovative Financing for Development and chair of UNITAID, a financing mechanism he conceived in 2004 to help provide medicines for HIV, tuberculosis and malaria in developing countries. The article discusses Douste-Blazy’s work and background, UNITAID, and other innovative financing schemes (Lines, 10/6).

Trans-Pacific Partnership Could Affect HIV/AIDS Drug Prices, Huffington Post Reports

The Huffington Post, as part of a collaboration on trade issues with the Dylan Ratigan Show, examines how “a new trade deal the Obama administration is pushing to complete with Vietnam and seven other Pacific nations threatens to seriously hinder both U.S. and international efforts to combat AIDS — including the government’s own efforts in Vietnam.” Under the Trans-Pacific Partnership, “U.S. negotiators are seeking to impose a set of restrictive intellectual property laws that would help American drug companies secure long-term monopolies overseas,” according to leaked documents, the Huffington Post writes.

CNBC.com Examines Counterfeit Pharmaceuticals In Special Report

In a special report, CNBC.com examines “the world of counterfeit pharmaceuticals, from the dangers they pose and where they’re made, to what is being done to combat them.” The news service notes that “[i]n some countries, counterfeit prescription drugs comprise as much as 70 percent of the drug supply and have been responsible for thousands of deaths in some of the world’s most impoverished nations, according to the World Health Organization (WHO),” and adds that counterfeit drugs also affect people in developed nations (Toscano, 10/4).

Global Corporations Create Shared Value Through Social Responsibility Programs

In this post in the Guardian’s “Sustainable Business Blog,” Mark Kramer, founder and managing director of the non-profit consulting firm FSG and senior fellow at the CSR Initiative at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, examines how “[g]lobal corporations are increasingly finding ways to create shared value — pursuing business initiatives that improve social and environmental conditions while earning the company a profit and conferring a competitive advantage.”

Mobile Technology Has Potential With Coordination Among Funders, Implementers

“The global health community has come to appreciate the potential of mHealth,” but the technology’s use for health programs in developing countries “remains in its infancy, with many of the characteristics and issues typical of young industries,” Amanda Glassman of the Center for Global Development (CGD) and Vicky Hausman of Dalberg Global Development…

Increased Communication Needed For TB Diagnostics Development

In this post on the PLoS “Speaking of Medicine” blog, Madhukar Pai, a professor and tuberculosis (TB) researcher based at McGill University, co-chair of the Stop TB Partnership’s New Diagnostics Working Group, and a consultant to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, describes a recent conference on TB diagnostics at…