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GlobalPost Examines Progress Against AIDS In Zimbabwe

GlobalPost examines efforts to combat AIDS in Zimbabwe as part of its “AIDS Turning Point” series. The news service writes that “what makes the case of Zimbabwe so curious — and even confounding to many outside observers — is that this country found success even though it was largely cut out of the big spending by PEPFAR’s list of 15 so-called ‘focus countries.'” GlobalPost continues, “Instead, Zimbabwe relies on its own well-mapped network of community health workers … who fan out daily across the country to make sure the country’s AIDS patients receive care.”

PEPFAR Strengthens AIDS Programs, Broader Health Care Systems, Goosby Says

Describing PEPFAR as “a targeted approach on a large-scale and with accountability for results,” U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador Eric Goosby on Tuesday said the program has done more than fight HIV/AIDS, having had a “broader transformational impact … on the health sector” in many countries, VOA News reports (De Capua, 7/10). Goosby delivered the keynote address at a Health Affairs briefing titled, “Assessing The President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief: Past Achievements And Future Prospects For PEPFAR,” according to a State Department video of his remarks (7/10). The July 2012 issue of Health Affairs “examines the origins of [PEPFAR]; the lessons learned from implementation; the successes achieved in terms of human health and well-being; and the opportunities that now exist to lay the groundwork for an ‘AIDS-free generation,'” the Health Affairs Blog states (Fleming, 7/10).

OPINION: Former Pres. Bush, PEPFAR 'Deserve Accolades'

As the XIX International AIDS Conference concludes in Washington, D.C., “[t]his is a moment for all Americans to be proud of the best thing George W. Bush did as president: launching an initiative to combat AIDS in Africa that has saved millions of lives,” Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson states in an opinion piece in the newspaper. PEPFAR “deserves accolades,” he writes, adding that the Bush administration ignored dissenting opinions stating that treatment in Africa posed a risk because of potential drug resistance and was motivated “by altruism” to create the program. Robinson notes that the Obama administration has proposed shifting funds from PEPFAR to “complementary programs” and that officials say “that overall HIV/AIDS funding will rise to an all-time high.” He also notes that Obama ended restrictions on allowing visas for people living with HIV to enter the country during his first year in office. “But if Africa is gaining ground against AIDS, history will note that it was Bush, more than any other individual, who turned the tide. The man who called himself the Decider will be held accountable for a host of calamitous decisions. But for opening his heart to Africa, he deserves nothing but gratitude and praise,” Robinson concludes (7/26).

Sen. Lugar Releases Hold On $250M Of PEPFAR Funds To Global Fund

Sen. Dick Lugar (R-Ind.) “announced Thursday that he would release his hold on the $250 million meant to go from the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria,” saying “he was swayed by conversations at the International AIDS Conference [AIDS 2012] under way in Washington, D.C.,” The Hill’s “Healthwatch” blog reports (Viebeck, 7/26). “My biggest concern about the transfer was the shortfalls this may cause in our bilateral efforts to combat HIV/AIDS,” Lugar said, according to a press release from the senator’s office (7/26). “‘The leaders I met with this week expressed their confidence that the money is a worthy investment, and, given their strong leadership, I have decided to lift my hold on the transfer funds,’ Lugar, the ranking Republican on the Foreign Relations Committee, said in a written statement,” CQ HealthBeat notes (Ethridge/Cadei, 7/26). In related news, the U.S. Senate on Thursday introduced and passed a resolution “expressing support for the XIX International AIDS Conference and the sense of the Senate that continued commitment by the United States to HIV/AIDS research, prevention, and treatment programs is crucial to protecting global health,” the New York Times’ “Inside Congress” reports (7/26).

PEPFAR, Private Partner Launch 5-Year 'Labs For Life' Initiative

At the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) on Thursday, PEPFAR and Becton, Dickinson and Company (BD), “announced Labs for Life, a new collaboration to help strengthen healthcare and laboratory systems in the developing world along with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),” a State Department fact sheet states (7/26). “The new five-year initiative builds on a previous five-year partnership between the U.S. government and [BD]” that “improved lab services in sub-Saharan African countries affected by HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis, according to U.S. officials who had been briefed on an audit that will be released in a few weeks,” CQ HealthBeat reports (Adams, 7/26).

RECENT RELEASE: AIDS 2012 Session Examines Possible PEPFAR, Global Fund Collaboration

The Center for Global Development’s “Global Health Policy” blog reports on a session at the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) examining “how PEPFAR and the Global Fund [to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria] could collaborate more strategically to maximize impact.” According to the blog, the session “featured insight from high-level PEPFAR and Global Fund officials, focused on the progress made and challenges faced as the two funding agencies try to increase collaboration,” and was “followed by three country-level perspectives from Haiti, Tanzania and Malawi” (Duran, 7/26).

PATH Blog Highlights Efforts To Reduce HIV In DRC

The PATH Blog reports on the organization’s efforts in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) “to reduce transmission of HIV, deliver integrated care and services for people affected by HIV/AIDS, and build up the country’s health system to expand and improve services.” The blog highlights a project known as ProVIC, which is funded by PEPFAR and “has reached more than a million people in the DRC with messages about preventing HIV.” The project focuses on data collection efforts for monitoring and evaluation, the blog notes (Donnelly, 7/17).

Cost Of HIV Drugs Cost Less Than Previously Thought, Clinton Foundation Study Says

“Lack of money can no longer be considered a reason — or an excuse — for failing to treat all those with HIV who need drugs to stay alive, following game-changing work about to be published by the Clinton Foundation that shows the real cost is four times less than previously thought,” the Guardian reports. “The striking findings of a substantial study carried out in five countries of sub-Saharan Africa are hugely important and will set a new hopeful tone for the International Aids Conference in Washington, which open[ed] on Sunday,” the news service writes.

OPINION: Momentum In HIV/AIDS Fight Must Continue And Extend To Other Diseases

Noting the successes of PEPFAR and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, former President George W. Bush writes in a Washington Post opinion piece that “[a]n important byproduct of this massive effort on HIV/AIDS has been the improvement of African health systems,” which “has raised an exciting prospect: to extend the gains on AIDS to other diseases.” Bush also discusses his work with the Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, a public-private partnership initiative spearheaded by the Bush Institute to save women from breast and cervical cancer. Over the past decade a “global effort” has saved millions of lives, he says, adding, “It would be a sad and terrible thing if the world chose this moment to lose its focus and will.” Bush concludes, “Other countries and local governments in Africa can do more in providing resources and increasing funding … [b]ut to continue the momentum in the fight against AIDS, America must continue to lead” (7/22).

Associated Press Examines HIV/AIDS In Uganda, Effects Of PEPFAR Funding

The Associated Press on Saturday examined the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Uganda, where “[a] new government report says the prevalence of HIV in this East African nation increased from 6.4 percent in 2004 to 7.3 percent in 2011, a shocking statistic for a country once praised for its global leadership in controlling AIDS.” The news service highlights PEPFAR’s contributions to fighting the epidemic in Uganda, noting that “[a]t least half of the 600,000 Ugandans in need of AIDS treatment are able to access the drugs, mostly through PEPFAR.” According to the AP, “U.S. government officials have been pressing Uganda to devote more resources to AIDS and issues such as maternal health, saying dependency on foreign support is unsustainable in the long term.” On a recent trip to the country, Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.) said meeting patients benefitting from PEPFAR-funded treatment “was confirmation of the fact that United States foreign aid works,” the AP writes (Muhumuza, 7/21).