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U.S. Travel Restrictions On Sex Workers Inhibit Effective HIV/AIDS Response

“[D]isappointingly, one group that will be absent [from the XIX International AIDS Conference next week] due to U.S. travel restrictions is sex workers,” a Lancet editorial states. “Sex workers have been extremely neglected as a population in the global response to HIV/AIDS, despite their substantially heightened risk of HIV infection and propensity to transmit new infections into general populations,” the editorial continues, adding, “Yet global funding allocations have been inadequate or restricted policies have been applied, such as the U.S. anti-prostitution pledge, which has greatly limited research and the response to HIV in sex workers. Furthermore, the conflation of sex work with human trafficking, and the disregard of sex work as work, has meant that sex workers’ rights have not been properly recognized.”

Obama Missing 'Historic Opportunity' By Not Appearing In Person At AIDS 2012

“President Barack Obama has a standing invitation to speak at the [XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C., next week], and he likely would be welcomed with loud cheers given his progressive HIV/AIDS policies,” journalist Jon Cohen writes in a Slate opinion piece. “But Obama apparently can’t carve out the time, which both runs the risk of angering a volatile community and squandering a historic opportunity,” he continues. Though some “U.S. government officials who have made presentations at the meeting … have weathered humiliating greetings, … Obama would face none of this hostility,” Cohen writes, noting that the U.S. “today spends more money on HIV/AIDS research than all countries combined and also is the single most generous donor to the global effort to combat the disease.”

Investing In Global Health Is In America's Best Interest

“Too few people realize that the health of Americans and the health of people around the world are inextricably linked,” Kevin De Cock, director of the Center for Global Health of the CDC, writes in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog. He continues, “In short, investing in global health isn’t just about humanitarianism. Cooperation across borders is essential in an increasingly connected world where diseases move as freely as people and products. It is in America’s interest to be a true global partner on health” (7/19).

Recognizing How Food, Nutrition Impact The HIV Response

“Ahead of the International AIDS Conference next week in Washington, D.C., Martin Bloem, chief of Nutrition and HIV Policy at the World Food Programme, shares the impact of food and nutrition on the HIV response,” in this post in the ONE Blog. “Scientific evidence and our own experience shows that nutrition activities for people living with HIV — including nutritional assessments, counseling, education and fortified food for malnourished patients — has significant impacts on the health of patients, on their ability to stay on treatment and on the effectiveness of treatment,” he writes (7/19).

Domestic PEPFAR Program Would Increase Coordination, Improve AIDS Response In U.S.

“Urban America continues to suffer high rates of HIV despite successes of antiretroviral treatment that can suppress the virus, decrease transmission, prevent progression to AIDS, and lower death rates,” Gregory Pappas, senior deputy director of the Washington, D.C., Department of Health’s HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration (HAHSTA), writes in a Washington Blade opinion piece. “The global U.S. response known as the President’s Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) succeeded by enhancing funding, coordinating government efforts and working across jurisdictions,” he states, adding, “A domestic PEPFAR would emphasize enhanced spending, promote regional data, and plan and coordinate services regionally.”

Blog Highlights Factors Potentially Affecting U.S. Support For Global AIDS Response In 2013

In this post in the Center for Global Development’s (CGD) “Global Health Policy” blog, Jenny Ottenhoff, policy outreach associate at the center, says “four big issues will impact U.S. support for the global response to the [AIDS] epidemic over the coming year.” According to Ottenhoff, these issues include the FY 2013 budget; the upcoming presidential election; “looming, automatic, across-the-board spending cuts that will be triggered under sequestration in January 2013”; and the potential reauthorization of PEPFAR, which will be decided in 2013. “These storm clouds over AIDS funding could turn out to have a silver lining if austerity creates pressures to improve the global response to AIDS in ways that make it more effective and efficient,” she writes (7/18).

Funding Must Support Optimism Surrounding HIV Prevention, Treatment

The goal of an “AIDS-free generation” “requires an ambitious implementation-science agenda that improves efficiency and effectiveness and incorporates strategies for overcoming the stigma and discrimination that continue to limit the uptake and utilization of [treatment, prevention and care] services,” AIDS 2012 Co-Chair Diane Havlir of the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine and Chris Beyrer of the Johns Hopkins Center for AIDS Research write in a New England Journal of Medicine opinion piece. They note that “[r]esearch efforts on HIV vaccines will also probably be key, and the field has been reinvigorated” by recent study results. “A combination approach to prevention that includes HIV treatment can generate tremendous gains in the short term by curtailing new HIV infections, but ending the AIDS epidemic will probably require a vaccine, a cure, or both,” they write.

Gates Foundation Blog Posts Reflect On London Summit On Family Planning

In this post in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog, Melinda Gates, co-chair of the foundation, reflects on the London Summit on Family Planning, which took place last week, writing, “I was humbled and thrilled by the world’s commitment to put women and girls back at the heart of the global health agenda. … Their enthusiasm shows that family planning is a high priority in the countries where many women and girls lack access, and that is the key to success in the long term” (7/18). In a related post on the blog, Gary Darmstadt, head of the Family Health Division at the foundation, writes, “At the Summit, the clear consensus among the participants was that responding to unmet need for family planning is a human right and we have an obligation to act. … Stakeholders agreed that women must be at the center of family planning decision-making at all levels” (7/18).

CSIS Official Discusses Upcoming AIDS 2012 Conference, Introduces New AIDS 2012 Course On iTunes U

In this post in the Center for Strategic & International Studies’ (CSIS) “Smart Global Health” blog, J. Stephen Morrison, senior vice president of CSIS and director of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, reflects on the upcoming International AIDS Conference, which opens in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, writing, “It is a choice opportunity in the midst of our bitter electoral season to tell the good news of the extraordinary achievements, at home and abroad, in both science and delivery of effective treatment, care, and prevention to people living with HIV or at risk of infection.” Morrison highlights the organization’s new AIDS 2012 course on iTunes U, noting readers can subscribe for additional updates on the conference (7/18). In a separate post, Julia Nagel, a web and social media associate at the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, provides a guide to the course (7/18).

American Leadership On HIV/AIDS Making A Difference In U.S. And Abroad

“As the two people who worked as physicians in the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic before the miracle of antiretroviral drug (ARV) therapy, and who now have the honor of leading the domestic and global HIV/AIDS programs for the Obama administration, we look back in awe of the American leadership that has transformed the epidemic in the 22 years since the International AIDS Conference was last held on U.S. soil,” Grant Colfax, director of the Office of National AIDS Policy, and U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador Eric Goosby, write in this Washington Blade opinion piece. “As we remember the lives lost to this disease and commit to the vision of an AIDS-free generation, it’s worth reflecting on how U.S. leadership and U.S. investments to combat HIV/AIDS domestically and internationally are saving lives and turning the tide against the disease,” they continue.