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UNEP Should Work To Bring About Safe Alternatives To DDT For Malaria Vector Control

Some countries in Africa “still rely on dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) for [malaria] vector control,” therefore “[i]t is … problematic that the U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP), without the consent of member states, and violating its own treaties, exerts relentless pressure to ban DDT globally,” Richard Tren, director of Africa Fighting Malaria, and Richard Nchabi Kamwi, Nambia’s minister of health and social services, write in a BMJ opinion piece. Nineteen countries reserve the right to use DDT under the 2000 Stockholm Convention, which “made an exception for DDT in disease vector control,” and the WHO endorses DDT, “arguing that a premature shift to less effective or more costly alternatives will have a negative impact on disease burden,” the authors state.

'Innovation, Markets, People, Political Leadership' Needed To Achieve Food Security

“Our global food security challenges are daunting: food price spikes and increasing food prices look set to continue unabated, around one billion are suffering from chronic hunger, and we must feed a growing population in the face of a wide range of adverse factors, including climate change,” but “I believe there is reason for optimism,” Sir Gordon Conway, professor of international development and agricultural impact at Imperial College London, writes in the Huffington Post U.K. “Impact” blog. “Yes we can feed the world, but only if we accept that agricultural development is the best route to achieving sustainable economic growth in developing countries, and achieve an agriculture that is highly productive, stable, resilient and equitable,” he continues, adding, “I believe there are four interconnected routes to achieving a food secure world: innovation, markets, people and political leadership.”

Examining Funding For TB Treatment In Europe

In a BMJ Group Blogs post, Caroline Robinson, global health advocacy manager for Results U.K., discusses the prevalence and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and drug-resistant TB in Europe and provides the example of Romania. She writes, “[E]vidence brought to light in a new report [.pdf] released recently outlining the effect funding shortages will have on HIV and TB, including drug-resistant TB, in the European region suggests that Romania does not have the institutional capacity to ensure its citizens have the basic right to health. The country relies on grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, which look set to end in 2013.” She continues, “[Global Fund] Board members should ensure that middle-income countries with epidemics among key populations can access critical Global Fund contributions and the E.U. and its member states must continue to provide the resources the fund requires to meet demand. Unless such support is given, countries like Romania will continue to fall further down the league tables in terms of treatment for this curable disease” (10/10).

Nutrition Education Needed To Combat Child Malnutrition In India

“Among causes of child malnutrition in India are not just poverty or inadequate access to food but also a lack of nutritional knowledge among families,” Nisha Malhotra, an instructor of economics at the University of British Columbia, writes in a Live Mint opinion piece. “Impressive growth and rising prosperity in the past three decades have not alleviated child malnutrition in the country,” she writes, noting, “An alarming 43 percent of children under age three in India are stunted, 48 percent are underweight, and 17 percent are ‘wasted.'” She continues, “In my research, I have emphasized and verified the importance of poor feeding practices in infancy to explain chronic child malnutrition in India,” adding, “Poverty is, of course, a contributor to poor feeding practices, but it is neither the sole reason for the situation nor the most significant reason.”

'Bold Goals' Needed To Spur Political Action In Fight Against Hunger

“Achieving the first Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of halving the prevalence of hunger in the world by 2015 is still within reach, but a strong, sustained acceleration of efforts is needed,” U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Director-General Jose Graziano da Silva writes in a Reuters opinion piece. He notes a new report from the Rome food agencies shows the “global number of chronically hungry people has declined by 130 million since 1990, falling from a little over one billion people to 868 million — 852 million of them in developing countries.”

FDA Task Force To Examine Solutions To Improve, Speed Antibiotic Research

“One of the most urgent global public health problems is the increasing capability of bacteria to resist antibiotic drugs,” a Washington Post editorial states. “The specter of a world without effective antibiotics has been looming for years, but recent evidence suggests that the superbugs are evolving ever faster,” the editorial continues. “Meanwhile, the pipeline of new antibiotics is running dry, leaving some patients with no effective treatment for life-threatening disease,” it adds.

More Toilets Would Help Save Lives In India

The controversy in India over “a self-evident statement by the rural development minister that India needs toilets more than it does temples … is a perfect example of the stupidity that too often dominates Indian politics,” GlobalPost senior correspondent Jason Overdorf writes in his blog “On India.” He continues, “Rather than shutting up and getting down to the business of improving lives, we’re descending into pointless name-calling and protesting over something on which, quite frankly, everybody secretly agrees.” Noting India has temples “just about anyplace that isn’t moving too fast,” he says,”[O]ne of the most salient differences between toilets and temples is that people will donate land and money and labor to build temples, they will fight for them tooth and nail, and the government will let them get away with virtually any skirting of the law in the process. Toilets? Not so much.”

Polio Vaccination Campaign In Darfur Shows Immunizations Possible In 'Emergency And Conflict Settings'

In an Inter Press Service opinion piece, Siddharth Chatterjee, chief diplomat and head of strategic partnerships at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, and Sam Agbo, an independent public health adviser in the U.K., write about the unstable situation in Darfur, Sudan, in 2004, and how “UNICEF and WHO in Sudan along with important NGO partners started planning with local authorities on how best to immunize all children in Darfur.” They outline the major challenges, including staff safety, and discuss how multi-agency teams were able to vaccinate 10,000 children in two immunization rounds. Chatterjee and Agbo add, “The polio immunization campaign was the driver for a wider process of improving and ramping up assistance to communities and this made the campaign attractive to mothers to bring their children to the immunization hubs that were established.”

'Political Will' Needed To Implement Solutions For Long-Term Food Security Challenges

“This month, President Obama’s Feed the Future initiative received a $1 billion pledge from U.S. organizations to address the root causes of hunger and poverty,” Rep. Mike Honda (D-Calif.) writes in the Huffington Post’s “Politics” blog, noting, “This pledge came on the heels of a $4 billion pledge by more than 60 companies from Africa and other continents.” He continues, “As co-chairman of the Congressional Ethiopia Caucus and the Congressional Out of Poverty Caucus, I commend these pledges and look forward to working with the administration as they are implemented.” However, he adds, “[t]hese are short-term fixes … to the long-term issues of chronic food insecurity and malnutrition facing millions.”

Europe Should Reframe Its Position In Global Health, Increase Coherence Between Policies, Practices

This Lancet editorial reflects on a panel discussion held last week at Europe House in London, titled “Beyond the Eurozone Crisis: New Realities for Global Health.” The editorial notes the aim of the meeting “was to discuss opportunities and challenges that Europe faces in the midst of the financial crisis, and how it can reposition itself around policies for global health in the context of a longer term shift in the world economic order, where developing countries have become the engines of growth.” The Lancet writes, “Despite a number of treaties, white papers, and communications around Europe and global health in the past decade, a clear European vision for global health has been strikingly absent,” adding, “The meeting discussed how individual member states have led the way in advancing the global health agenda, for example, the U.K. and its Health is Global strategy.” The editorial concludes, “In a shifting landscape, it is important that Europe reframes its position in global health and aligns itself to gain greater coherence between policies, strategies, and practices. Huge health, economic, and societal benefits for developing countries and Europe can be achieved” (10/6).