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Given The Chance, World's Poor, Underserved Communities Could End Hunger, Poverty

In this post in Huffington Post’s “Impact” blog, Eric Holt Gimenez, executive director of Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy, reflects on the global implications of a drought in the U.S., writing, “[I]f the 2008 and 2011 food price crises are any guide, the global effects of the U.S. drought are fairly predictable.” He continues, “The failure of the U.S. corn harvests spells a disaster for the world’s poor, but not because the poor eat our corn. … The poor will suffer the third global food disaster in four years because the price of corn will push up the price of other food commodities, like wheat, soybeans and rice …, push[ing] up food prices overall.” He writes, “The global response to food crises is also well rehearsed,” and makes a number of predictions as to how USAID, the United States Department of Agriculture, “seed and chemical monopolies,” and “the mega-philanthropies” will respond to the crisis.

International Community Must Demonstrate 'Olympian Leadership' To Improve Global Nutrition

In this post in the Chicago Council on Global Affairs’ “Global Food For Thought” blog, Howarth Bouis, director of HarvestPlus, a global research program that develops and disseminates nutrient-rich staple food crops to improve nutrition globally, writes, “David Cameron’s decision to tie a hunger summit to the Olympics was imaginative … because Cameron saw how the Olympics, that celebrate the best of human athleticism and teamwork, could also be used to draw attention to those who will never ever come close to competing in an Olympics event.” He continues, “The Global Hunger Event exemplified the approach that we need if we are to race, not inch, towards the finish line of significantly improving nutrition by the next Olympic Games,” concluding, “Collectively, we must now assume this mantle of Olympian leadership if we are to bring down the historic and arbitrary barriers between agriculture, nutrition and health ” (8/17).

World Humanitarian Day A Time To Pay Tribute To Those Who Risk Their Lives For The Less Fortunate

In a post in the Guardian’s “Comment is Free” blog, Kristalina Georgieva, the European Commissioner for International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response, writes that World Humanitarian Day, observed August 19, “is a day to pay tribute to all humanitarian personnel who have lost their lives in the line of duty and to all those who continue to take risks to relieve the suffering of the less fortunate.” She continues, “Humanitarian work is one of the world’s most dangerous professions. Kidnappings, shootings and death threats are all part of the job description in places such as Sudan, Syria, Somalia and others blighted by conflict,” adding, “Those who work in this rocky terrain are increasingly exposed to risk while maintaining a lifeline to the victims of wars and disasters.”

In Face Of Global Economic Recession, Developing World Needs Low-Tech Health Innovations

“The developing world needs support for low-tech health innovations that do not compromise on effectiveness,” journalist Priya Shetty writes in this SciDev.Net opinion piece, adding that, against the backdrop of global economic recession and shrinking research and development (R&D) budgets in many developing countries, “a new movement of ‘frugal science’ is taking hold, in which researchers are hunting for the most cost-effective health technologies for developing countries.” Shetty writes, “Cost is rarely the only limiting factor; health technologies need to be ‘low-tech’ — as electricity supplies can be erratic, or hospital environments not always sterile, for instance — without being ‘low-spec,'” and continues, “Achieving this balance requires innovative thinking, which is why researchers from around the world are developing an evidence base for the most effective and innovative healthcare technologies for poorer countries.”

Achieving AIDS-Free Generation Worth More Than Olympic Gold

In this post in Huffington Post’s “Healthy Living” blog, John-Manuel Andriote, a journalist and author living with HIV, writes, “For all of us living with HIV infection — Oct. 27 will mark seven years since my own diagnosis — the question we face daily, hopefully more consciously and deliberately than most, is how shall we live, knowing as we do that we will most assuredly die one day?” Reflecting on the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) that took place in Washington last month, he continues, “An AIDS-free generation is certainly a worthy goal,” but “even if tens of billions of additional dollars are allocated to address HIV/AIDS, even if the Republicans don’t succeed in inflicting their Darwinian ‘survival of the fittest’ upon the nation and the world, the question will continue to be what it has been for 31 years … Will we have the political will to end AIDS?”

Maternal Healthcare Providers In Developing World Must Be Trained To Show Respect, Compassion

“In teaching nurses and midwives in the developing world to care for their patients, a core tenet is that respectful care is quality care,” Catherine Carr, senior maternal health advisor for the Jhpiego/MCHIP-Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program, writes in this post in Huffington Post’s “Global Motherhood” blog. “Around the globe, health-care workers are being trained in respectful, humanized care, because all patients, regardless of economic status or geographic location, deserve to be treated with reverence and consideration,” she continues, adding, “Unfortunately, there is still a huge gap between the maternal care a pregnant woman should receive and what she actually experiences.”

With 1 Billion People Chronically Hungry, Now Is The Time To Address Family Planning

“With one billion people chronically hungry and Earth’s population expected to increase by 50 percent before the end of the century, it’s time to get serious about family planning,” a Los Angeles Times editorial states. “At one point, the prevailing wisdom was that nations needed robust birthrates to protect their economic welfare, and that if only we could produce food more efficiently, feeding the Earth’s burgeoning population wouldn’t be a problem,” it continues, adding, “Now … we know better. Or we ought to.” The editorial continues, “No one has a good solution. That’s why family planning assistance is one of the most important forms of humanitarian aid that the United States and other developed nations can provide.” It concludes, “Without the necessary resources and an existing economy prepared to absorb large numbers of new workers, nations that promote high birthrates set themselves up for economic distress and political unrest” (8/10).

Universal HIV Treatment, If Achieved, Would Not Mean Eradication Of AIDS

In this post in BMJ’s “Yankee Doodling,” Douglas Kamerow, chief scientist at RTI International and an associate editor for the journal, reflects on the possibility of achieving an AIDS-free generation “if somehow we succeeded in getting all HIV positive people in the world identified and under long term treatment.” He writes that while there has been “astonishing progress against AIDS,” “two concerns immediately arise: the magnitude of the work remaining to find and continuously treat all those infected, and the confusion between that treatment (even if it is somehow universally successful) and actual eradication of the disease.” He concludes, “It is a rosy scenario, but even if it came true it still would not spell the end of the HIV story,” because “[w]e have no vaccine, and the virus keeps mutating” (8/14).