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PBS Examines Cookstoves’ Impact On Health

PBS NewsHour discusses the impact of cookstoves on health around the globe. PBS NewsHour: Designing cleaner stoves for home cooks in the developing world PBS NewsHour Special Correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on “efforts to provide cleaner stoves to people in developing countries” as part of his ongoing series,…

WHO Calls On Governments To Invest In Hearing Care

U.N. News Centre: U.N. health agency calls on countries to invest in prevention and care for hearing loss “The United Nations health agency is calling on governments to invest in hearing care, as a new survey finds that many countries lack the capacity to prevent and care for hearing loss,…

WHO Says Sugar Should Be 5% Of Daily Caloric Intake

Media outlets report on the WHO’s recommendation that daily sugar intake should be five percent of total calories consumed. The WHO has launched a public consultation on its draft sugar guidelines.Associated Press: WHO: 5 percent of calories should be from sugar “…The World Health Organization says your daily sugar intake…

Arogya World Announces New Global Survey On Women, NCDs

“Arogya World, with partner organizations from multiple sectors, announced [Friday], in advance of International Women’s Day, the start of a global quantitative survey to gather the perspectives of 10,000 women in 10 countries on non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Arogya World and its partners Novartis, Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, American Cancer…

Controversy Expected Over WHO Sugar Recommendations, Nature Reports

Nature: Storm brewing over WHO sugar proposal “Scientists are gearing up for a battle with the food industry after the World Health Organization (WHO) moved to halve its recommendation on sugar intake. Nutrition researchers fear a backlash similar to that seen in 2003, when the WHO released its current guidelines…

June Issue Of WHO Bulletin Available Online

The June issue of the WHO Bulletin includes an editorial on the management of non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries; a public health round-up; an article on anti-smoking measures and tobacco consumption in Turkey; and a research paper on mortality in women in Burkina Faso in the years following obstetric complications (June 2012).

Growing Obesity In Developing Countries A Sign Of Historic Global Tipping Point

In this Bloomberg Businessweek opinion piece, Charles Kenny, a fellow at the Center for Global Development and the New America Foundation, examines the global obesity epidemic, writing, “It may seem strange to be worried about too much food when the United Nations suggests that, as the planet’s population continues to expand, about one billion people may still be undernourished,” but “[g]rowing obesity in poorer countries is a sign of a historic global tipping point.” He continues, “After millennia when the biggest food-related threat to humanity was the risk of having too little, the 21st century is one where the fear is having too much.”

Study Finds 'Alarming Patterns' Of Tobacco Use In Developing Countries

“Two fifths of men in developing countries still smoke or use tobacco, and women are increasingly starting to smoke at younger ages, according to a large international study which found ‘alarming patterns’ of tobacco use,” Reuters reports (Kelland, 8/17). The study, published Friday in the Lancet, “covered enough representative samples to estimate tobacco use among three billion people” and “‘demonstrates an urgent need for policy change in low- and middle-income countries,’ said lead researcher Gary Giovino,” according to CNN (Levs, 8/17). “‘Although 1.1 billion people have been covered by the adoption of the most effective tobacco control policies since 2008, 83 percent of the world’s population are not covered by two or more of these policies,’ said [Giovino],” Reuters adds (8/17).

Mysterious Kidney Disease ‘Devastating’ Central America’s Pacific Coast, AP Reports

The Associated Press/Seattle Times reports on a “mysterious epidemic [that] is devastating the Pacific Coast of Central America, killing more than 24,000 people in El Salvador and Nicaragua since 2000 and striking thousands of others with chronic kidney disease at rates unseen virtually anywhere else.” The news service provides statistics regarding kidney disease in various Central American countries, quotes a number of experts regarding potential causes of the disease and notes, “While some of the rising numbers may be from better record-keeping, scientists believe they are facing something deadly and previously unknown to medicine.”