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GAVI Alliance To Fund HPV Immunization Projects In 8 Countries

The GAVI Alliance “is to help protect more than 180,000 girls in eight countries across Africa and Asia from cervical cancer by funding immunization projects with vaccines from Merck and GlaxoSmithKline,” Reuters reports in an article examining the group’s efforts to vaccinate young women with Merck’s Gardasil and GSK’s Cervarix, “the world’s…

Ahead Of World Cancer Day, WHO Survey Shows Half Of All Countries Struggle To Prevent Cancer, Provide Long-Term Treatment

“Ahead of World Cancer Day, the United Nations health agency [Friday] launched a survey showing that more than half of all countries are struggling to prevent cancer and to provide appropriate long-term treatment and care to avoid human suffering and protect countries’ social and economic development,” the U.N. News Centre reports (2/1). “This means, currently…

WHO Discusses ‘Zero Draft’ Of New Global Mental Health Action Plan

“The World Health Organization (WHO) discussed the ‘zero draft’ of a new Global Mental Health Action Plan last week, which, if adopted, would set clear goals for progress and aim to improve accountability in improving mental health care around the world,” GlobalPost’s “Global Pulse” blog reports. “The action plan will…

Reuters Reports On Obesity Talks At World Economic Forum

Reuters reports on discussions taking place at the World Economic Forum (WEF), taking place in Davos, Switzerland, this week, writing, “Obesity, a major factor in diabetes and heart disease, imposes costs on both public and private sectors and is a drag on economic growth, but business leaders meeting in Davos can’t…

Blog Highlights Global Health Challenges, Opportunities In 2013

Chatham House’s “Expert Comment” blog features commentary on four global health issues the organization’s experts view as important in the year ahead. David Heymann, head and senior fellow of the Chatham House Centre on Global Health Security, introduces the post by summarizing “[i]mportant developments in global health last year” and…

12 Countries Sign U.N. Treaty To Fight Illegal Tobacco Trade

“Twelve countries [on Thursday] signed a new United Nations treaty that aims to counter the illegal tobacco trade, which undermines regulation policies and represents a burden for health care systems,” the U.N. News Centre reports (1/10). “The Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products was signed by representatives from China, France,…

Foreign Aid Will Not Solve NCDs In Low-, Middle-Income Countries

Focusing on foreign aid as a solution to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries “creates a dangerous mindset of dependency on Western countries rather than encouraging citizens to hold their own governments to account,” Greg Paton, a technical adviser to the Uganda NCD Alliance, writes in the Arogya World…

Seattle Times Examines Partnership Between Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Uganda Cancer Institute

The Seattle Times examines a partnership between the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI). In 2008, “the two institutes formally agreed to collaborate on clinical care and research projects, and more recently a major building project at Uganda’s only cancer-research center,” the newspaper writes. Corey Casper, director of the UCI/Fred Hutchinson Research Center Cancer Alliance, “says [the partnership] has the potential to demonstrate ‘that you can do first-rate research that can alter the impact of cancer care in the developing world, and that the craft of oncology can be practiced as well in Africa as it is in the developed world, just like it is with HIV,'” according to the Seattle Times (Silberner, 12/16).

Rwanda Implementing Programs To Prevent Cancer

In a Huffington Post “Impact” blog post, Tom Murphy, founder of the development blog “A View From The Cave,” examines Rwanda’s efforts to reduce cancer incidence by implementing screening programs for breast and cervical cancers and vaccinating girls and young women for human papillomavirus (HPV), the leading cause of cervical cancer. Discussing the new programs, Minister of Health Agnes Bingawaho said, “We are a government that is evidence-based and result-oriented. … We always go for a policy first — the science in front of everything. We develop a strategy plan, followed by an implementation plan and then fundraise,” according to Murphy. He discusses Rwandan President Paul Kagame’s push for accountability within the government, the U.N. General Assembly’s resolution recognizing non-communicable diseases as a global problem, and efforts by Merck and the GAVI Alliance to vaccinate more girls against HPV (12/18).

Global Burden Of Disease Study Finds People Worldwide Living Longer, But With More Illness, Disability

“A sharp decline in deaths from malnutrition and infectious diseases like measles and tuberculosis has caused a shift in global mortality patterns over the past 20 years, according to a [study released] on Thursday, with far more of the world’s population now living into old age and dying from diseases mostly associated with rich countries, like cancer and heart disease,” the New York Times reports (Tavernise, 12/13). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010, “published in the Lancet, has taken more than five years and involves 486 authors in 50 countries,” the Guardian’s “Poverty Matters” blog notes (Mead, 12/13). Researchers worldwide “drew conclusions from nearly 100,000 data sources, including surveys, censuses, hospital records and verbal autopsies,” NPR’s “Shots” blog writes (Doucleff, 12/13). The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2010 consists of “[s]even separate reports conducted by researchers at the University of Washington, the Harvard School of Public Health, and elsewhere [that] gauged people’s health in 187 countries and determined that developing countries are looking more like richer Westernized countries in terms of the health problems that pose the biggest burden: high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, and heart disease,” according to the Boston Globe (Kotz, 12/13).