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Reports Examine Progress In Global NTD Response

Writing in the ONE Blog, Neeraj Mistry, managing director of the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases, highlights two reports released last week that examine global efforts against neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) one year after the London Declaration, as well as a report by the Hudson Institute, also released last…

Carter Center Guinea Worm Eradication Program In ‘Final Stages’

“Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter announced today that the international Guinea worm eradication campaign spearheaded by the Carter Center has reached its final stages with only 542 cases reported worldwide in 2012,” a Carter Center press release reports, noting the provisional case numbers show cases of the disease were halved in 2012…

NTD Treatments Are Cost-Effective, Report Shows

“Recently, Hudson Institute’s Center for Science in Public Policy, in partnership with the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases, published a new report to highlight the links between NTDs and socio-economic prosperity,” according to the network’s “End the Neglect” blog. “The paper found NTD control and elimination efforts to be both inexpensive…

Reports Examine Global NTD Response One Year After London Declaration

Two reports released Wednesday provide an update on the global response against neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) a year after leaders of some of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies met in London and agreed to fight the diseases, Guardian health editor Sarah Boseley reports in her “Global Health Blog” (1/16). In…

Blog Features Two Posts On New NTD Publications

The Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases’ (NTDs) “End the Neglect” blog features two posts discussing the first anniversary of the London Declaration and two recently released reports on progress against NTDs. Simon Bush: Discussing the new NTD Scorecard (.xls) and the “From Promises to Progress” report from Uniting to Combat NTDs,…

WHO Warns Of Dengue’s Spread, Says Progress Made Against NTDs In New Report

“Dengue is the world’s fastest-spreading tropical disease and represents a ‘pandemic threat,’ infecting an estimated 50 million people across all continents, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday,” Reuters reports. In a statement, the WHO said dengue “register[ed] a 30-fold increase in disease incidence over the past 50 years,” and the…

Research Shows Genetic Factors Increase Risk Of Visceral Leishmaniasis

A new study published in Nature Genetics last week shows that genetics likely influence whether an individual develops visceral leishmaniasis, a lethal form of the parasitic disease transmitted by sandflies, the New York Times reports. In 80 percent of cases, leishmaniasis causes painful skin boils, but in 20 percent of cases, the disease –…

NEJM Examines Global Disease Eradication Efforts

“Since the last case of naturally occurring smallpox, in 1977, there have been three major international conferences devoted to the concept of disease eradication,” an article in the New England Journal of Medicine reports and includes “[a] brief review of five diseases selected for eradication or elimination [that] illustrate the potential benefits…

Experts At December WHO Meeting Agree Upon Sleeping Sickness Elimination Plan

Experts at a December 2012 WHO meeting agreed on a plan to eliminate sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis), the Lancet reports. Highlighting the difference between eradication — “incidence is permanently reduced to zero cases worldwide and no further action is needed” — and elimination — “incidence is reduced to zero cases worldwide or in a defined geographical area but action might be needed to keep it that way” — the journal writes the goal is to bring the number of cases to zero, as eradication would mean ridding the world of the tsetse fly, which is responsible for transmission.