Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

Trending on kff Ebola Marketplaces Enrollment

National Security and Bioterrorism

  • your selections
Clear Search

Filter Results

date

Tags

  • results
WHO Executive Board Meeting Addresses Agency’s Policy On Counterfeit, Substandard Medications

Intellectual Property Watch reports on how delegates at WHO’s executive board meeting used Wednesday to discuss WHO policy on counterfeit and substandard medications. According to the news service, WHO “members … raised strong concerns that a working group they mandated last May to address problems with WHO policy on counterfeit and substandard medicines has yet to be formed – with four months remaining before it must report back to members.”

Also In Global Health News: Sec. Clinton In Yemen; China’s Ability To Track Outbreaks; Global Health Interests Among Medical Residents; Children Of Sex Workers

During Surprise Stop In Yemen, Sec. Clinton To Highlight U.S. Commitment To Country’s Development U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton arrived in Yemen Tuesday “on a diplomatically sensitive mission to broaden America’s relationship with this impoverished Arab country, a haven for Al Qaeda that has nurtured several recent terror…

CQ Looks At Plans For House Foreign Affairs Committee To Evaluate U.N. Programs

CQ Today examines how Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), House Foreign Affairs Committee chair, “has vowed to use her new [position] to take on the U.N. and some of its more controversial practices.” Ros-Lehtinen scheduled a public briefing titled ‘The United Nations: Urgent Problems that Need Congressional Action’ Jan. 12, during which the “committee will hear from a host of groups long critical of the U.N., including the Heritage Foundation and U.N. Watch,” according to the news service.

Reuters Examines Foreign Aid’s Prospects In New Congress; Foreign Policy Looks At Clinton’s State Dept. Staff Memo

Reuters examines how the efforts of “budget-minded lawmakers [in the new U.S. Congress will] seek to curb costs without undercutting military operations” could impact U.S.-backed aid programs, including those in Afghanistan. “‘[Y]ou’ll see a Republican party focused on funding the military effort while trying to cut back on civilian assistance,’ said one Democratic congressional aide, speaking on condition of anonymity,” according to Reuters. “A senior Republican aide said many lawmakers in the new Congress would be reluctant to fund State Department or aid programs, especially those in conflict zones, in part because they believed State had poorly managed its activities in Iraq.”

Recent Releases In Global Health

Here is a sampling of blog posts analyzing the  Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) after it was released on Wednesday: Council on Foreign Relations: Weighing an Ambitious QDDR (Garrett et al., 12/16); CGD’s “Rethinking U.S. Foreign Assistance Blog”: The QDDR: Whew, It’s Done (Or Is It?) (Veillette, 12/16); State Department’s…

Respondents Overestimate Amount U.S. Government Spends On Foreign Aid, Poll Finds

A recent poll found that respondents “vastly overestimate[d]” the amount the U.S. government spends on foreign aid, PBS NewsHour reports. “The median answer was roughly 25 percent, according to the poll of 848 Americans. In reality, about 1 percent of the budget is allotted to foreign aid,” the news service writes (Sullivan, 12/6).

Recent Releases In Global Health

New This Week In The Kaiser Global Health Policy Tracker: The President’s Malaria Initiative announced a new focus country and USAID released a new fact sheet on the agency’s reform initiative. Kaiser’s Policy Tracker provides a timely single reference point for the latest information on congressional and administration action on global health. Strengthening…