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MDGs/Post-2015 MDG Agenda

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Blog Examines Future Of Global Development Agenda

“For more than a decade, the global conversation about development has been dominated by the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs),” Stewart Patrick, a senior fellow and director of the program on international institutions and global governance at the Council on Foreign Relations, writes in the Council’s “The Internationalist” blog, noting, “The global development community is now debating what should replace the MDGs when they expire in 2015.” He highlights a report, titled “Post-2015 Development Agenda: Goals, Targets and Indicators,” released recently by the Canada-based Center for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), and details 11 goals recommended by the report’s authors to replace the current MDGs (11/7).

Pacific Island Nations Show Progress On Child Mortality MDG But Challenged On Reducing Poverty, Report Says

“The Pacific Islands are making steady progress on reducing child mortality, but most are struggling to eradicate poverty and generate employment for young and rapidly growing populations,” Inter Press Service reports in an article examining how 10 of 14 nations in the region are on track to meet the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) on child mortality. The 2012 Regional MDG Tracking Report (.pdf), recently released by the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF), “comes three years after PIF countries signed a compact to strengthen the co-ordination of resources to boost development progress,” IPS notes. Though many of the countries might reach MDG 4 to halve child mortality by 2015, “[h]alving the proportion of people living in extreme poverty by 2015, as mandated by MDG 1, is a considerable challenge across the Pacific,” the news agency states. IPS discusses progress on the MDG goals for specific nations in the region. “The PIF believes that accelerated regional progress on the goals before 2015 is dependent on political will,” the news agency writes (Wilson, 11/7).

AIDS Organizations Release Discussion Paper On Post-2015 Development Agenda

The International AIDS Alliance, in collaboration with the Stop AIDS Alliance and STOP AIDS NOW!, has published “a discussion paper to help the HIV community to engage in” discussions surrounding the post-2015 development agenda, the International AIDS Alliance’s blog reports. “It is unclear at this stage how HIV and AIDS will be addressed in the new post-2015 development framework and the HIV sector could potentially lose out if HIV is not specifically addressed in it,” the blog states. The paper addresses issues such as universal health coverage, human rights and equity, and financing, and it offers suggestions on ways to engage with consultations (11/1).

U.K. PM Outlines Agenda For Post-2015 Development As High-Level Meeting Concludes In London

“This generation has a unique opportunity to eradicate extreme poverty, [U.K. Prime Minister] David Cameron said on Thursday as he outlined an agenda to follow the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which expire in 2015,” the Guardian reports. Cameron was speaking to reporters following the first substantive meeting of a high-level U.N. panel co-chaired by himself, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, and Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and tasked by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon “to lay out a framework that will follow the MDGs,” the newspaper notes. The co-chairs “all emphasized the importance of listening to civil society, the private sector and young people, in an attempt to achieve the widest possible consensus for the follow-up to the MDGs,” the Guardian writes, adding, “The U.N. says a post-2015 framework will have at its core the continuing fight against poverty, climate change and sustainable development, while addressing inclusive growth, equality, peace and security, and human rights” (Tran, 11/1). “The panel will meet again in Monrovia and Jakarta next year” before providing a draft report to Ban, BBC News notes (Loyn, 11/1).

Global Wealth Inequality Threatens Progress Made In Reducing Child Mortality, Save The Children Report Says

While progress has been made worldwide in reducing child mortality, the effects have been unequal across income groups, and wealth inequalities are at the highest level in 20 years and increasing, according to a report (.pdf) from Save the Children U.K., BBC News reports (10/31). Released ahead of a meeting of a U.N. high-level panel on poverty taking place in London this week, the report, titled “Born Equal,” “argues that against a backdrop of overwhelming progress (extreme income poverty has dropped from two billion in 1990 to less than 1.3 billion today and child mortality has almost halved) the poorest of the poor have too often been excluded,” which “means that children living in the same country may have vastly different chances of surviving to the age of five, getting a good education and eating a nutritious diet,” a Save the Children press release states. Save the Children U.K. Chief Executive Justin Forsyth said, “Unless inequality is addressed, the [Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)] and any future development framework will simply not succeed in maintaining or accelerating progress” in reducing child mortality, according to the press release (11/1).

High-Level U.N. Panel Meets In London To Discuss Post-2015 Global Development Agenda

A 26-member high-level U.N. panel is meeting this week in London to discuss the post-2015 global development agenda, when the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set forth in 2000 are set to expire, the Guardian reports and provides a questions and answers “about the progress, process, and thinking behind the next set of global development targets.” This marks the first substantive meeting for the panel of experts and politicians, who are tasked with developing a draft report for U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon scheduled to be delivered in March, according to the newspaper. The theme of this week’s meeting is household poverty, the Guardian notes, and discusses how the panel’s work coincides with the Rio+20 summit and what might be included in the next set of development goals (Tran, 10/31). Another Guardian article features key datasets on the eight MDGs (Provost, 10/31).

Health Must Be Recognized In Future Framework For Fighting Global Poverty

Noting “[w]e are just three years away from the target date for achieving the U.N. Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) agreed by all … U.N. member states back in 2000 to eradicate global poverty,” Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, in this Independent opinion piece reflects “on the critical role of health in and beyond the Millennium Development Goals” ahead of the second meeting of the U.N. Secretary General’s High-Level Panel on the future strategy to fight global poverty, set to take place in London on Wednesday. Piot writes that the MDGs have “given local and global focus to efforts to tackle the big issues,” while inspiring action, innovation, and new financing models, but he notes “there is still so much more we need to do.”

WHO Releases Discussion Paper Examining Potential Global Health Goals For Post-2015 Agenda

“The World Health Organization (WHO) has released a discussion paper [.pdf] identifying issues to be considered in the context of potential global health goals for the post-2015 agenda,” the International Institute for Sustainable Development reports in an article on its webpage. “The paper suggests universal health coverage (UHC) as an inclusive umbrella for addressing these issues” and “notes that post-2015 goals should build on progress achieved under the framework of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), while future goals and indicators need to: be framed as global challenges rather than aspirations for developing countries; ensure policy coherence; and take a strategic approach,” according to the article (October 2012).

Maternal, Child Health Programs Must Reach Poorest Families To Be Successful

“Worldwide, evidence-based interventions are being implemented in an effort to drive down child mortality and there are some signs that they are working,” a Lancet editorial states. “However, few countries are on course to meet the targets set by Millennium Development Goal 4,” the editorial notes. “Most maternal and child health programs do not reach the world’s poorest families; it is believed that efforts to do so cannot be successful, cost effective, and equitable,” it continues, adding, “Yet if interventions could reach these families, overall nutrition and health would improve and the lives of millions of children could be saved.”