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Rescue, Relief Efforts Continue In Haiti, 200,000 People Estimated To Have Perished In Quake

Rescue efforts continue in Haiti after a major earthquake hit the country last week, CNN reports (1/18). While teams still search for survivors under the rubble, the priority is shifting to relief for those who survived the quake, Nicholas Reader, spokesperson for the U.N.Offices for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, TIME reports (Newton-Small,1/18).

Also In Global Health News: Family Planning In Philippines; Drug Pricing In Africa

Government Releases Family Planning Survey In Philippines A government survey in the Philippines “found 73 percent of married women would use birth control if it were available, 22 percentage points higher than the 51 percent that did use such methods,” Agence France-Presse reports. The country is facing a rapid population…

AP, IRIN Examine Lawsuit Challenging Plumpy’nut Patent

The Associated Press examines the decision by two U.S. nonprofit groups seeking to increase production of the ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), Plumpy’nut, to file a lawsuit against the French organizations that hold the product’s U.S. patent.

UNAIDS Chief Calls For Reducing MTCT Of HIV In Africa

UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibe on Monday during a five-day trip in Kenya, called for a drastic reduction in mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, Capital News reports. “In our continent we still have 400,000 babies born every year with HIV and we know if we are capable of making sure that testing will become available universally to all our pregnant women, (and) that pregnant women also have access to treatment, we will prevent the transmission,” Sidibe said (Karong’o, 1/11).

UNICEF Program Aimed At Curbing Deaths In West Africa Falls Short Of Goals, Study Finds

A $27 million UNICEF program that aims to decrease disease-related child deaths in West Africa did not meet its goal of reducing death rates by at least 25 percent at the conclusion of 2006, according to a Lancet study published on Tuesday, the Associated Press reports. “The U.N. children’s agency pursued strategies like vaccinating children, giving them vitamin A pills and distributing bednets to protect against malaria from 2001 to 2005 in parts of 11 countries,” according to the article.

Obama Administration Supports Cairo Conference Goals, Clinton Says

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Friday “reiterated the Obama administration’s support” for universal access to family planning and maternal health care, All Headline News reports. Clinton spoke at an event marking the 15th anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development Action Plan held in Cairo, Egypt.

Wall Street Journal Examines Polio Vaccinations In Afghanistan

In a story about polio vaccination campaigns in Afghanistan, the Wall Street Journal examines how the Taliban and international health agencies are working together to promote oral vaccination campaigns across the country. Vaccination campaign volunteers usually bring a “single-page letter requesting people to cooperate, ‘for the benefit of our next generations.’ The letter’s signatory: Mullah Mohammad Omar, the one-eyed supreme leader of the Taliban,” according to the Wall Street Journal.

Recent Releases In Global Health

‘Accelerated Progress’ Required To Meet Child Mortality MDG By 2015 A Lancet Comment examines the “grossly insufficient” progress towards meeting the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of reducing under-5 child mortality. “Accelerated progress can be achieved, even in the poorest environments, through: integrated, evidence-driven, and community-based programmes that focus on addressing…

Media Examines Efforts To Treat Patients, Train Doctors In Afghanistan, Fight Malnutrition

The Los Angeles Times examines the International Medical Corps’ work in Afghanistan. “Although less well known than the Nobel-winning Doctors Without Borders, the [International Medical Corps] shares a reputation with its gutsy counterpart for working in places where no one else will go. … In parts of Afghanistan where government forces have…