Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

Trending on kff Ebola Marketplaces Consumer Resources

Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

  • your selections
Clear Search

Filter Results

date

Tags

  • results
Save The Children Releases Annual Motherhood Index, Ranking Niger ‘Worst Place To Be A Mother’

Save the Children’s 13th annual “State of the World’s Mothers” report, released Tuesday, “shows Niger as the worst place to be a mother in the world — replacing Afghanistan for the first time in two years,” and ranks Norway as the best place to be a mother, according to a Save the Children press release. “The ranking, which compares 165 countries around the globe, looks at factors such as mothers’ health, education and economic status, as well as critical child indicators such as health and nutrition,” the press release notes (5/8). “In addition to its annual ranking, the charity’s report emphasized the issue of children’s nutrition,” Global News Desk writes, adding that the report “noted that one in four of the world’s children are chronically malnourished or stunted — with little access to proper nutrients” (Diao, 5/8).

Former Model, Advocate Christy Turlington Burns Discusses ‘No Mother’s Day’ Advocacy Campaign

In his column, “The Common Good,” Forbes contributor Rahim Kanani interviews “former model, author and advocate for maternal and child health Christy Turlington Burns” regarding “the founding of her organization Every Mother Counts (EMC), lessons she’s learned around advocating for global change, her new campaign, titled ‘No Mother’s Day,’ advice to the class of 2012, and much more.” In the interview, Turlington Burns discusses the motivation behind EMC and her “advocacy and mobilization campaign to increase education and support for maternal mortality reduction globally”; highlights her 2010 documentary “No Woman, No Cry”; and encourages others to visit the campaign’s website to find ways to get involved.

Child Death Across Sub-Saharan Africa Declining At Accelerated Rate, Report Shows

“New statistics show that the rate of child death across sub-Saharan Africa is not just in decline — but that decline has massively accelerated, just in the last few years,” Michael Clemens, a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development (CGD), writes in the center’s “Global Development: Views from the Center” blog, citing a paper released last week by Gabriel Demombynes and Karina Trommlerova in the Kenya office of the World Bank. Clemens provides “figures for some of the recent changes in rates of child death across the continent” and concludes, “This will be startling news for anyone who still thinks sub-Saharan Africa is mired in unending poverty and death” (5/4).

KFF Issues New Brief On Statutory Requirements & Policies Governing U.S. Global Family Planning And Reproductive Health Efforts

The Kaiser Family Foundation on Thursday released a new issue brief that “provides a summary of the major policies and statutory requirements governing U.S. participation in international family planning and reproductive health efforts,” according to the website. “These laws and policies collectively direct how funds are spent, which organizations receive funds and generally shape U.S. family planning and reproductive health activities around the world,” the website adds (5/3).

Guardian Examines Launch Of GAVI-Sponsored Immunization Campaign In Ghana

Ghana’s recent “rollout of the rotavirus vaccine and, to much acclaim, a new vaccine against pneumococcal infections, [makes it] the first country in sub-Saharan African to introduce two new vaccines at the same time,” the Guardian reports. The immunization campaign, organized by the Ghanaian government and the GAVI Alliance in partnership with other international agencies, philanthropies and the private sector, is “expected to save thousands of lives,” the newspaper notes. “That GAVI has deemed Ghana able to introduce rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines together is a vote of confidence in the country’s ability to establish a ‘cold chain,'” a refrigeration network necessary to keep the vaccines viable, according to the Guardian.

Sierra Leone Has Made Progress In Improving Maternal, Child Health Care, But ‘Much More To Do’

“Just two years ago, our country had one of the worst maternal and infant death rates in the world,” Sierra Leone President Ernest Bai Koroma writes in a Huffington Post U.K. “Impact” blog post, adding, “We knew something had to be done.” So in September 2009, the government announced “that all health user fees would be removed for pregnant and lactating women and children under the age of five” and “introduced the Free Health Care Initiative [FHCI] in April 2010, which would give around 460,000 women and a million children a much better chance of having a longer and happier life,” Koroma writes. In one year, the FHCI facilitated a “214 percent increase in the number of children attending outpatient units” and a 61 percent reduction in “the number of women dying from pregnancy complications at facilities,” and “increased the number of health workers and ensured they were given big salary rises to reflect the importance of their positions,” he notes.

UNFPA, International Confederation of Midwives Recognize International Day Of The Midwife

In a joint statement (.pdf), UNFPA Executive Director Babatunde Osotimehin and Agneta Bridges, secretary-general of the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM), recognize the International Day of the Midwife on May 5. “The right to health is a basic human right that every woman should enjoy. Yet, every day, almost 1,000 women die in pregnancy and childbirth … One of the main causes for these tragedies is lack of access to maternity services, including the care of midwives or others with midwifery skills at childbirth,” they write, continuing, “Urgent action is needed to achieve the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 on child and maternal health before the target year of 2015, and investing in human resources for health, especially midwifery, is one the soundest investments a country can make to accelerate progress” (5/4).

Copenhagen Consensus Report Argues For Expanding Family Planning Programs In ‘High-Fertility’ Countries

As part of a series of Slate articles highlighting issues being examined by the Copenhagen Consensus Center, Bjorn Lomborg, director of the center, examines the implications of population growth on development indicators. In a research paper released on Thursday “for Copenhagen Consensus 2012, Hans-Peter Kohler of the University of Pennsylvania looks at sub-Saharan African nations that, among high-fertility countries, make the dominant contribution to world population growth,” he notes, adding, “‘High-fertility’ countries today account for about 38 percent of the 78 million people that are added annually to the world population, despite the fact that they are home to only 18 percent of the population.”

U.N. Adopts Resolution On Young People’s Sexual And Reproductive Rights

This RH Reality Check post by the International Planned Parenthood Federation Western Hemisphere Region (IPPFWHR) examines a “resolution in support of young people’s sexual and reproductive health and human rights” adopted recently by member states at the 45th Session of the United Nations Commission on Population and Development (CPD). According to the post, “[k]ey points of the final resolution include: The right of young people to decide on all matters related to their sexuality; Access to sexual and reproductive health services … that respect confidentiality and do not discriminate; The right of youth to comprehensive sexuality education; Protection and promotion of young people’s right to control their sexuality free from violence, discrimination and coercion” (5/3).