Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

HIV/AIDS

  • Your Selections:

Refine Results

date

Tags

As Interest In Global Health Rises In U.S., San Francisco Stands At Forefront Of Field

The San Francisco Chronicle reports on a growing interest in global health throughout the U.S. and how Jaime Sepulveda, who served as head of epidemiology in Mexico in the early 1980s and who took over the Global Health Sciences division at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) earlier this month, “hopes to make the Bay Area a powerhouse in research and development of global health policies worldwide.” The newspaper writes, “In the past five years, global health has taken off at the Bay Area’s top research institutions,” adding, “Both UCSF and Stanford have opened new global health centers, and Kaiser Permanente — the Bay Area’s largest health care provider — has formalized a program to send its doctors and nurses overseas.”

Fight Against HIV Losing Momentum; Robust Analysis Needed To Develop Long-Term Strategy

“After a decade of unprecedented increases in donor funding and a corresponding 17 percent decline worldwide in the number of new infections, the fight against HIV is losing momentum,” Bjorn Lomborg, director of the Copenhagen Consensus Center and an adjunct professor at Copenhagen Business School, and Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and former executive director of UNAIDS, write in this Wall Street Journal opinion piece.

Multi-Donor Program Improves Availability Of Essential Medicines In Zimbabwe's Public Health Sector

IRIN reports on “[t]he improved availability of essential medicines in Zimbabwe’s public health sector” as a result of “a multi-donor program started in 2008 through collaboration between the government, the U.N. Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Zimbabwe, the European Union (E.U.), the U.K., Australia, Canada and Ireland.” “According to a survey carried out by the E.U., 80 percent of essential medicines are now available at over 80 percent of health facilities compared to only 28 percent availability of vital drugs at public health institutions in 2008,” IRIN notes. The news service writes, “To date, the Essential Medicines Supply Programme (EMSP) has received $52 million in funding, according to UNICEF,” adding, “The money is used to buy drugs and medical supplies which are distributed to health centers by Natpharm, the supply arm of the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare” (9/20).

Early ART Cost Effectiveness In Resource-Poor Settings

A study published in PLoS Medicine shows “that the new WHO guidelines for early [antiretroviral treatment (ART)] initiation can be cost-effective in resource-poor settings, information that should help policymakers in developing countries allocate their often limited resources,” according to a PLoS press release. Bruce Schackman of Weill Cornell Medical College and…

Celebrating Partnerships That Lead To Sustainable, Locally Managed HIV/AIDS Response Efforts

Mary Fanning, South Africa’s country coordinator for PEPFAR, writes in a New Age guest column, “In the fight against HIV/AIDS, this is a time of hope. It’s also a time to celebrate the partnerships that are advancing this work and to recommit to a plan to ensure prevention, treatment and care for those infected and affected is sustainable and locally managed,” adding, “Ultimately, whether it’s putting more people on treatment, supporting HIV testing campaigns or leveraging mass media to drive the prevention message, the partnership between the U.S. and South African governments saves lives.”

Archbishop Tutu Calls On Obama To Lead The World In Expansion Of HIV Treatment

Nobel Peace Prize winner and human rights advocate Archbishop Desmond Tutu writes in a Washington Post opinion piece that President Barack Obama “is in a position to make a game-changing impact on the war against AIDS” and he “should lead the world in a massive effort to expand access to treatment and rid humanity of AIDS — the most devastating disease of our time.” However, “just as the end of AIDS has finally come within reach, we are witnessing an unprecedented drop in financial and political support for the cause,” he adds.

'Science Speaks' Interviews Director Of Multilateral Diplomacy At OGAC

In the second in a series of interviews with staff members of the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC), which is responsible for PEPFAR, the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog speaks with Winnie Roberts, director of multilateral diplomacy at OGAC. Roberts discusses negotiations surrounding the…

'ScienceSpeaks' Interviews Director Of Technical Leadership At OGAC

The Center for Global Health Policy’s “ScienceSpeaks” blog features an interview with Caroline Ryan, director of technical leadership at the Office of U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC), where she has worked for seven years. Ryan discusses PEPFAR program implementation, circumcision as an HIV prevention tool and balancing efficiency with the…

GlobalPost Examines GHI In Kenya

As part of its special report “Healing the World,” GlobalPost examines how the Obama administration’s Global Health Initiative (GHI) is affecting U.S. health-related work in Kenya.

The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Headquarters: 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 | Phone 650-854-9400
Washington Offices and Barbara Jordan Conference Center: 1330 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005 | Phone 202-347-5270

www.kff.org | Email Alerts: kff.org/email | facebook.com/KaiserFamilyFoundation | twitter.com/KaiserFamFound

Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization based in Menlo Park, California.