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Scientists Plan To Announce Research Strategy Aimed At Pursuing HIV/AIDS Cure, Wall Street Journal Reports

On July 19, ahead of the XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C., “prominent AIDS scientists plan to announce the first comprehensive research strategy aimed at pursuing new leads and addressing hurdles to a cure” for HIV/AIDS, the Wall Street Journal reports. “The announcement of the initiative will be followed by a two-day symposium on cure research,” the newspaper continues, noting, “Recent research has offered a glimpse of paths to a cure. That promise, together with breakthroughs in preventing transmission of the disease, is spurring optimism that the epidemic, which kills about 1.7 million people a year, can eventually be brought under control.” The newspaper highlights several cases and studies on prevention and treatment (McKay/Winslow, 7/18). The Associated Press/Washington Post features a video examining some of the research (Bradley, 7/19).

International Partnership For Microbicides CEO Discusses Research In GlobalPost Interview

GlobalPost’s “Global Pulse” blog features an interview with Zeda Rosenberg, CEO of the International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM), in which she discusses a study of a vaginal ring containing the antiretroviral (ARV) dapivirine. The study, which “has been launched in Africa, mark[s] a step forward in the development of HIV protection for and under control of women,” the blog notes. Rosenberg addresses the importance of finding a female-controlled HIV prevention option, why women are more susceptible to HIV infection, and her motivation for becoming involved in HIV research, among other issues, according to the blog (Judem, 7/18).

Funding Must Support Optimism Surrounding HIV Prevention, Treatment

The goal of an “AIDS-free generation” “requires an ambitious implementation-science agenda that improves efficiency and effectiveness and incorporates strategies for overcoming the stigma and discrimination that continue to limit the uptake and utilization of [treatment, prevention and care] services,” AIDS 2012 Co-Chair Diane Havlir of the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine and Chris Beyrer of the Johns Hopkins Center for AIDS Research write in a New England Journal of Medicine opinion piece. They note that “[r]esearch efforts on HIV vaccines will also probably be key, and the field has been reinvigorated” by recent study results. “A combination approach to prevention that includes HIV treatment can generate tremendous gains in the short term by curtailing new HIV infections, but ending the AIDS epidemic will probably require a vaccine, a cure, or both,” they write.

Peace Corps Volunteers Provide HIV/AIDS Prevention, Awareness

Carrie Hessler-Radelet, deputy director of the Peace Corps, discusses the agency’s work in HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and support in an AIDS.gov blog post. “Last year alone, 52 percent of all Peace Corps Volunteers engaged in such work in communities overseas,” she writes, noting, “In 2013, through the Global Health Service Partnership, we look forward to placing doctors and nurses as adjunct faculty in training institutions in Africa.” She says that every volunteer working in Africa is trained in HIV/AIDS prevention and awareness, outlines how volunteers contribute to the fight against the disease, and concludes, “So many of today’s inequalities, such as poverty, hunger, and HIV/AIDS, still loom large in much of our world. But, even as we face new challenges, we must continue to work together to make sure we can achieve an AIDS-free generation” (7/18).

CSIS Official Discusses Upcoming AIDS 2012 Conference, Introduces New AIDS 2012 Course On iTunes U

In this post in the Center for Strategic & International Studies’ (CSIS) “Smart Global Health” blog, J. Stephen Morrison, senior vice president of CSIS and director of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, reflects on the upcoming International AIDS Conference, which opens in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, writing, “It is a choice opportunity in the midst of our bitter electoral season to tell the good news of the extraordinary achievements, at home and abroad, in both science and delivery of effective treatment, care, and prevention to people living with HIV or at risk of infection.” Morrison highlights the organization’s new AIDS 2012 course on iTunes U, noting readers can subscribe for additional updates on the conference (7/18). In a separate post, Julia Nagel, a web and social media associate at the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, provides a guide to the course (7/18).

American Leadership On HIV/AIDS Making A Difference In U.S. And Abroad

“As the two people who worked as physicians in the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic before the miracle of antiretroviral drug (ARV) therapy, and who now have the honor of leading the domestic and global HIV/AIDS programs for the Obama administration, we look back in awe of the American leadership that has transformed the epidemic in the 22 years since the International AIDS Conference was last held on U.S. soil,” Grant Colfax, director of the Office of National AIDS Policy, and U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador Eric Goosby, write in this Washington Blade opinion piece. “As we remember the lives lost to this disease and commit to the vision of an AIDS-free generation, it’s worth reflecting on how U.S. leadership and U.S. investments to combat HIV/AIDS domestically and internationally are saving lives and turning the tide against the disease,” they continue.

PBS NewsHour Shares Stories Of Those Affected By HIV/AIDS Epidemic

“As Washington prepares to host the International AIDS Conference from July 22-27, PBS NewsHour will profile some of the parallel stories unfolding around the epidemic on opposite ends of the globe,” the news service writes. In the first of these stories, the news service profiles two individuals — John Johnson in Washington, D.C., and Alice Sibanda in Hwange, Zimbabwe — who as children lost their parents to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Noting Zimbabwe and Washington, D.C., are “8,000 miles apart and nearly as distant economically,” the news service writes, “Both have some of the highest HIV/AIDS rates in the world” (Kane, 7/18).

Africa's New Partnership For Sustainable Health Development 'Makes Sense'

With Africa’s “emerging position in the global order, … [a]stute African leaders are striving to ensure that this realignment delivers a new paradigm of partnership for sustainable health development — a partnership that is led by Africa, for Africans, through African-sourced solutions,” UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibe writes in a Huffington Post “Impact Blog” opinion piece. The African Union is taking steps “to reduce the continent’s dependence on foreign solutions and foreign ‘aid’ while adopting and scaling up development solutions that have been proven to work in different African countries, and finding better and more sustainable approaches to financing them,” he states. “It makes a lot of sense to apply such an approach to addressing three killer diseases: AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria,” he continues, adding that “the overreliance of Africa’s AIDS response on foreign investments, foreign drugs and foreign solutions must be addressed.”

PATH Blog Highlights Efforts To Reduce HIV In DRC

The PATH Blog reports on the organization’s efforts in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) “to reduce transmission of HIV, deliver integrated care and services for people affected by HIV/AIDS, and build up the country’s health system to expand and improve services.” The blog highlights a project known as ProVIC, which is funded by PEPFAR and “has reached more than a million people in the DRC with messages about preventing HIV.” The project focuses on data collection efforts for monitoring and evaluation, the blog notes (Donnelly, 7/17).

Better Methods Needed To Diagnose And Treat HIV, TB In Children

Jennifer Furin, an infectious diseases physician and medical anthropologist who specializes in the management of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV in resource-poor settings, writes in a post in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog that “when it comes to the great advancements made in global HIV and TB care, children are being left behind.” She continues, “All children with HIV and TB deserve access to diagnosis and treatment, and the death of even a single child from either one of these diseases signifies a global failure. … It is time to require that pediatric formulations of TB and HIV medications be developed.” She notes that StopTB.org will host a talk show on July 22 featuring women and young people who have been affected by TB and HIV (7/17).

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