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American Medical News Examines PEPFAR Five-Year Strategy

American Medical News examines the future of PEPFAR, as outlined in a five-year strategy released Dec. 1. “The plan’s five-year strategy report calls for strengthening other countries’ abilities to lead [a] response to the AIDS epidemic and other health issues, and expanding prevention, care and treatment,” the news service writes. “It also seeks to integrate and coordinate HIV/AIDS programs with broader global health and development programs to maximize the impact on health systems, and invest in innovation and operations research to improve patient care and provide the best outcomes.”

Opinion: Food Aid; HIV Vaccine, Microbicide Research; Global Tobacco Surveillance

Business Day Examines Business Of Feeding World’s Hungry In a Business Day opinion piece, analyst Shoshana Perrey examines U.S. food aid policy: “When the U.S. Congress passed Bill PL 480 in 1954, the American food aid regime was founded on four principles: find an outlet for the mounting tonnes of…

Opinions: Global Health Top Foreign Policy Issue; Global Food Security; Opiate-Substitution Programs In Eastern Europe; Feed The Future; Foreign Aid Lessons

Global Health Is A Top Foreign Policy IssuesFor 2011 In response to a story examining 2011’s top foreign policy issues, Serra Sippel, president of the Center for Health and Gender Equity, writes in a letter to the editor, published in The Hill, that “[g]lobal health was disturbingly absent from” the story. “Global…

Also In Global Health News: Vaccination Hampered In Cote d’Ivoire; TB And Lung Cancer; HIV Testing, Counseling In Zambia; Reducing Child, Maternal Mortality In Ghana; Male Circumcision Campaign In Kenya

Political Unrest Hampering Cote d’Ivoire’s Yellow Fever Vaccine Campaign “Unrest following Cote d’Ivoire’s presidential election is blocking a nationwide vaccination drive against yellow fever, a fatal mosquito-borne disease that is affecting people throughout the country,” IRIN reports. The immunization campaign – part of a global effort by WHO and UNICEF –…

Indian Drugmaker Seeks To Make, Sell Generic Version Of Pfizer’s HIV Drug

The Indian drugmaker Natco Pharma “said Wednesday it has informed Pfizer Inc. that it wants to make and sell a low-cost generic version of the U.S. company’s [drug] maraviroc for treating the HIV infection under a so-called ‘compulsory license’ [CL],” Dow Jones Newswires/Smart Money reports. “Natco Pharma’s move is significant because, if successful, the Indian generic drug maker will set a precedent for other Indian companies to override multinational drug makers’ patents for the treatments of diseases ranging from cancer to hypertension,” according to the new service.

Also In Global Health News: Field Trial To Fight Dengue In Australia; Bangladesh Reducing Child Mortality; Yellow Fever In Uganda; HIV/AIDS In Iran

Dengue-Blocking Mosquitoes Field Trial To Kick Off Tuesday In Australia AAP/Sydney Morning Herald reports that a 12-week field trial involving the release of mosquitoes infected with a bacterium known to block the transmission of dengue will kick off Tuesday in several suburbs in north Queensland, Australia. “Laboratory research has shown…

Indian Government Rejects Abbott’s Patent Application For Second-Line ARV

India’s patent office “has rejected American drug maker Abbott Laboratories’ patent application for an HIV combination drug, allowing low-cost local drug makers to make and sell their generic versions in India and other countries where the medicine is not patented,” Economic Times reports (1/4). The drug under consideration was Abbott’s “Kaletra, which combines two antivirals, [lopinavir/ritonavir and] is one of the preferred second-line treatments to fight drug-resistant HIV, according to the World Health Organization, which recommends governments include it on their list of essential medicines,” Bloomberg/Businessweek writes (Narayan, 1/4).