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Shah Congratulates Researchers On PrEP Findings

In statement released Thursday, USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah said, “I congratulate the Partners PrEP and CDC TDF2 teams on their study findings demonstrating that PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) – and HIV medication when taken orally, once a day – is highly effective in preventing HIV in heterosexual men and women. ……

U.S. Will Strengthen Health Work In Haiti

In a post on the AIDS.gov blog, Ambassador Eric Goosby, U.S. global AIDS coordinator, writes about a recent visit to Haiti and gives an update on U.S. work with Haiti. “Going forward, America will continue to strengthen our partnership with Haiti on health. U.S. health activities in Haiti are an…

Scientific American Presents Slide Show On MTCT Prevention

UNICEF’s goal of eliminating mother-to-child HIV transmission by 2015 is “ambitious … but not impossible,” Scientific American reports. The magazine presents a slide show that “explores what is needed to stop mother-to-child HIV transmission by 2015, following Inonge Siamalambo and her baby Elson of Lusaka, Zambia, through their 18-month commitment to a transmission prevention program” (Diep, 7/13).

New Survey On Access To HIV Prevention And Treatment Among MSM

A new survey (.pdf) of more than 5,000 men who have sex with men (MSM), conducted by the Global Forum on MSM & HIV (MSMGF), “has shown that less than half of MSM around the world have easy access to lifesaving HIV prevention and treatment services,” according to an MSMGF…

Foreign Policy Examines HIV Epidemic In Swaziland

Foreign Policy examines the HIV epidemic in Swaziland, where nearly one-fifth of residents are infected. Because of the country’s high per capita infection rate, “[o]ne might expect HIV to slap you in the face. But there are no buildings collapsed by an HIV earthquake, no towns flooded by an HIV tsunami. No zombie-sick people dripping HIV from their eyeballs. You don’t see obvious signs of it outside of the clinics and hospitals or the privacy of homesteads,” the article states. While “Swaziland’s HIV orphans present a frightening problem for the country’s future,” the piece describes one program, called Pasture Valley, that is helping a couple dozen orphans gain an education and health care (Raviv, 7/12).

Gates Foundation Grand Challenges Explorations Grant Recipients Look To Fight Malaria, HIV

The Associated Press/Atlanta Journal-Constitution examines two research proposals – “[u]sing microwaves to kill malaria parasites and developing a way to give fetuses immunity to HIV” – that, along with 10 other research projects, have moved into the second phase of funding as part of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Grand Challenges Explorations.

Two New Studies Support Use Of PrEP For HIV Prevention Among Heterosexual Men And Women

“Two new studies done in three African countries have shown for the first time that AIDS drugs taken daily can cut by more than half a person’s chance of becoming infected with HIV through heterosexual intercourse,” the Washington Post reports. One of the studies, carried out in Kenya and Uganda by the University of Washington, was halted a year and a half early because of positive results, while the other, conducted in Botswana by the CDC, ended as scheduled in the spring, according to the newspaper (Brown, 7/13).

Gilead Becomes First Company To License Drugs To Medicines Patent Pool

“In the first agreement between a pharmaceutical company and the new international Medicines Patent Pool, Gilead Sciences announced Tuesday that it would license four of its AIDS and hepatitis B drugs to the pool,” the New York Times reports (McNeil, 7/12).

BRICS Health Ministers Agree To Improve Access To Low-Cost Medicines

Health ministers from Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa in Beijing “on Monday vowed to improve access to low-cost and high-quality medicine – and called on developed nations to shoulder responsibility in helping the poor,” Agence France-Presse reports (7/11).

Donors Should Continue To Provide AIDS Funding To China, UNAIDS Head Says

Cutting AIDS funding to China will “be a big mistake for a donor and particularly, for anyone who’s invested in China today, … for the simple reason that this funding is a catalytic fund,” UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibe told Reuters in an interview on Monday.