Filling the need for trusted information on health issues…

Trending on kff Enrollment Marketplaces Medicare Advantage

Health Workforce & Capacity

  • your selections
Clear Search

Filter Results

date

Tags

  • results
Recent Releases In Global Health

Lancet Comment Asks: What’s Next For Global Fund? Reflecting on the recent annual report by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, a Lancet comment writes, “Two big challenges remain [for the Global Fund]: first, to show, reliably and independently, that the Fund’s investments have delivered the benefits that it…

Haitian President To Meet With Obama As Long-Term Rebuilding Plans Take Shape

Haitian President Rene Preval is expected to meet with President Barack Obama Wednesday in the U.S. to ask for “billions of dollars to rebuild” Haiti, Agence France-Presse reports. The White House said that Obama will emphasize that the U.S. is a “friend and partner” to Haiti and discuss ways the international community could aid Haiti (Burleigh, 3/7).

Also In Global Health News: U.S. Ambassador To U.N.; Male Circumcision; River Blindness In Ecuador; Nursing Shortage In Caribbean; Maternal Health In Bolivia; Drug-Resistant TB In North Korea; Cholera Vaccine

U.S. Ambassador To U.N. In Geneva Assumes Position, Ending 13 Month Vacancy Betty King reported to her new position as U.S. ambassador to the U.N. in Geneva on Wednesday, the Associated Press reports. “Washington’s Geneva mission had been without an ambassador since Warren W. Tichenor left his post on Jan.…

News Outlets Examine Development Of Low-Cost Diagnostic Tool, Infectious Disease Surveillance

CNN examines the work of a Harvard University chemistry professor to “shrink a medical laboratory onto a piece of paper that’s the size of a fingerprint and costs about a penny.” According to George Whitesides, who created a prototype of the inexpensive paper “chip,” the technology could be used to diagnose such diseases as HIV, malaria and tuberculosis in developing countries.

Health Worker Training Program Cuts Stillbirths By 30% In 6 Developing Countries, Study Says

The rate of stillbirths was cut by more than 30 percent after health workers in rural parts of six developing countries were trained “in how to help a newborn start breathing and to keep it warm and clean,” according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Reuters reports. The trainees – who included midwives, nurses, traditional birth attendants and physicians – were given “hand-held pumps and masks to fill babies’ lungs with air if they were not breathing at birth, clean-delivery kits to prevent infection and scales to measure their weight,” the news service writes.

Also In Global Health News: N. Korea Harvest; Zimbabwe’s Health System; Malaria Parasite; Training India’s Rural Health Workers; Myanmar Recovery; Health In Uganda

Poor Grain Harvest To Worsen Food Shortages In N. Korea A poor grain harvest in 2009 is likely to exacerbate North Korea’s severe food shortages, Agence France-Presse reports (2/9). “The North is estimated to have produced 4.1 million tons of grain last year, a drop of about 200,000 tons compared…

Recent Releases In Global Health

Under Shah’s Leadership, USAID Poised ‘To Regain Its Prominence’ In Global Nutrition, Lancet Opinion Says  Rajiv Shah’s appointment as USAID administrator “comes at a crucial time of challenge and opportunity for the Agency to improve the nutritional well-being of impoverished societies,” write the authors of a Lancet Comment that examines…