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PEPFAR Announces Nursing Education Partnership Initiative For Health In Africa

The U.S. government on Thursday “formally announced the Nursing Education Partnership Initiative (NEPI) in Lilongwe, Malawi,” according to a State Department press release. The PEPFAR initiative aims to “strengthen the quality and capacity of nursing and midwifery education institutions, increase the number of highly skilled nurses and midwives, and support innovative…

Raising Salaries Helped Retain Health Workers In Malawi

Mary O’Neil, a principal program associate at Management Sciences for Health (MSH), examines how Malawi has reduced health care worker migration through a program to raise salaries, “with support from the U.K.’s Department for International Development (DFID) and other development partners,” in this post in the Global Health Council’s Global…

Innovative Programs Can Help Developing Countries Retain Health Care Workers

“Medical schools in poor countries continue to produce doctors that they will eventually lose to more lucrative careers in cities or other countries,” but some of these countries “are already showing bold efforts to meet the challenge” of retaining health care workers, Manuel Dayrit, director of the WHO Department of Human Resources for Health, writes in a SciDev.Net opinion piece. Dayrit discusses programs in Ethiopia, Sudan, and the Philippines that use community-based education and local service contracts to retain health care workers in areas where they are needed.

Blog Examines Implementation Of Health Insurance Program In Rwanda

In Humanosphere, journalist Tom Paulson examines Rwanda’s recent success in implementing a health “insurance program that has covered most of the population with an emphasis on basic, preventative care.” Including comments from Peter Drobac of Partners in Health and Jeffrey Sachs of Columbia University, Paulson focuses on the role of…

Incorporating Informal Health Providers Into TB Treatment, Care

According to a literature review recently published in PLoS One, informal health providers account for “nine percent to 90 percent of all health care interactions in low- and middle-income countries (depending on the country, the disease in question and the methods of measurement),” Gina Lagomarsino, a principal and managing director at…

Also In Global Health News: PEPFAR-Supported Programs In Uganda; Cholera In Nigeria; $275M For Jordan’s Water Supply; Recovered Global Fund Money In Uganda; Maternal Health In India; Malnutrition In Yemen

PEPFAR Awards $250M To Uganda For HIV/AIDS Treatment, Prevention Programs The U.S. government, through PEPFAR, has provided “eleven new awards [which] amount to a quarter of a billion dollar investment over five years” to Uganda “in support” of the country’s HIV/AIDS response, a U.S. Mission press release states (10/21). Uganda’s…

Also In Global Health News: U.S. Rice Exports To Haiti; Somali Ambulance Workers; HIV In Kenya; Gates Foundation Global Health Work; U.N.’s Congo Mission; U.S. Involvement In Unethical Medical Research

U.S. Should Stop Subsidizing Rice Exports To Haiti, Oxfam Says In a new report, aid agency Oxfam “has called on the United States to stop subsidising American rice exports to Haiti, the poorest country in the western hemisphere, because it says the policy undermines local production of food,” BBC reports.…

Delegates From Nine African Countries Discuss Health Information Systems

Nine southern African countries and donors have gathered in Namibia for the second regional leadership in Health Information Systems (HIS) meeting to discuss “how recipient countries should take ownership of these systems,” New Era reports (Sasman, 10/26). Participant countries “will work together to develop country specific strategies to strengthen their national HIS and prepare a country-led action plan,” writes the Southern Times. More than 100 delegates representing Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe are expected to attend from ministries of finance, health, science, information and statistics bureaus (Nashuuta, 10/22).

ECSA Forum Kicks Off Monday With Discussion On Effects Of Funding, Health Worker Shortages On MDGs

“Officially opening the East, Central and Southern Africa (ECSA) forum on best practices and joint consultative meeting on Monday, [Zimbabwe Minister of Health and Child Welfare Henry] Madzorera said the shortage of health workers and the growing burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases had slowed down progress” toward achieving the U.N. Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), NewsDay reports.

Also In Global Health News: Synthetic Blood Development; HIV In Mozambique; Health Care Access In India; Health Care Workforce In Low-Income Countries

Los Angeles Times Examines Challenges, Potential Benefits Of Developing Artificial Blood The Los Angeles Times examines scientists’ efforts to develop synthetic blood substitutes, writing that many attempts have “failed to meet rigid safety standards.” The WHO “estimates that 44% of women who die in childbirth succumb to blood loss” in sub-Saharan…

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