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All Health Workers In Rural Africa Should Have Access To Bikes For Transportation

In a CNN opinion piece published as part of a series produced in association with the Skoll World Forum “on people who are finding new ways to help solve the world’s biggest problems,” Andrea Coleman and Barry Coleman, co-founders of Riders for Health, an organization that helps health workers in…

Gunmen Kill Polio Vaccine Worker In Pakistan; Two Others Wounded

News outlets report on the killing of a polio vaccine worker in Pakistan and how the Taliban is hindering efforts to eradicate the disease. Agence France-Presse: Gunmen kill vaccinator in NW Pakistan “Gunmen shot dead a health officer supervising an anti-polio vaccination campaign after storming a hospital where children were…

New Issue of ‘Global Fund News Flash’ Available Online

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has published Issue 35 of its newsletter, the “Global Fund News Flash.” The issue notes the new funding application materials are available online and includes an obituary for Rangarirai Chiteure, coordinator for the Country Coordinating Mechanism in Zimbabwe, as well as…

Community Field Officers ‘Making Namibia A Healthy Nation’

In a guest post in the ONE Blog, the CDC describes the work of two Development Aid from People to People (DAPP) field officers in Namibia, where they travel to rural communities to conduct HIV/AIDS counseling and testing. “Through this work they have established strong links between health facilities and…

Health Workers Key To 'Effective Health Care Delivery'

In addition to “essential money,” “the right policies, government commitment and citizen accountability” are needed to decrease child mortality and improve other global health indicators, “[b]ut the sine qua non for effective health care delivery is health workers. Whether it’s prevention, treatment or care, it’s all about health workers,” Jonathan Glennie, a research fellow at the Overseas Development Institute, writes in a post on the Guardian’s “Poverty Matters Blog.”

Global Health 'Blunders' Can Lend Useful Lessons

New York Times reporter Lawrence Altman recounts his experience in the mid-1960s with a measles immunization campaign in Upper Volta (now Burkina Faso) during his time with the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the CDC in a “Doctor’s World” perspective piece in the newspaper. Altman says that although the effort to expand the immunization campaign from a small field trial to a regional program “failed miserably,” the “lessons learned from these blunders led to a new program that wiped out smallpox, still the only human disease to have been eradicated from the planet.”

Hospital In Libyan City Of Sirte Running Low On Supplies

Health care workers fleeing the besieged Libyan city of Sirte on Sunday said people wounded in the fighting “are dying on the operating table because fuel for the hospital generator has run out,” Reuters reports. “The fighting has entered its third week and civilians are caught up in a worsening humanitarian crisis,” the news agency writes, adding that “[a]id workers from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) who brought medical supplies into Sirte on Saturday could not reach the hospital because of shooting.” The organization said it plans to return to Sirte and reach the hospital if security allows, Reuters notes (10/2).

Health Clinic In Indonesia Promotes Conservation Through Medical Care

VOA News profiles a medical clinic in West Kalimantan, Indonesia, called Alam Sehat Lestari, or ASRI, and established by American Kinari Webb, that aims to promote health and wellness through quality medical care and conservation. In addition to allowing patients to pay for health care “through non-monetary means, such as woven baskets, seedlings or labor exchanges,” clinic workers educate patients about conservation as they wait to register, and each month they visit surrounding communities to determine whether they are illegally logging from a nearby national park, the news service notes. “Communities that do not participate in illegal logging pay about 40 percent less than those that do,” according to VOA News (Schonhardt, 10/4).

CDC Report Lays Out 'Lessons Learned' From Haiti's Cholera Outbreak

“Cholera cases have risen in Haiti, but the number dying from the disease is down, according to researchers from the [CDC],” CNN’s health blog “The Chart” reports. Robert Tauxe, researcher and deputy director at CDC said, “The number of deaths was initially way too high. But within a few weeks of the outbreak, we trained teams to treat the disease and increased access to supplies,” according to the blog. The new CDC report “lay[s] out the lessons learned since cholera emerged in Haiti and what needs to be done to sustain the progress that has been made to treat the disease and prevent deaths,” the blog notes, adding, “The most beneficial lessons may seem quite simple” and include training more health workers, educating citizens and improving sanitation systems (Dellorto, 10/13).

Security Issues, Rains Hampering Relief Efforts In Horn Of Africa

Security issues and torrential rains are hampering relief efforts aimed at fighting severe malnutrition and disease in the Horn of Africa, the Guardian reports. Last week, two workers with Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) were kidnapped, allegedly by the Islamist militant group al-Shabab, prompting the group to evacuate some of its staff from two of three refugee camps on the border of Somalia and Kenya, according to the newspaper.