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Innovative Programs Can Help Developing Countries Retain Health Care Workers

“Medical schools in poor countries continue to produce doctors that they will eventually lose to more lucrative careers in cities or other countries,” but some of these countries “are already showing bold efforts to meet the challenge” of retaining health care workers, Manuel Dayrit, director of the WHO Department of Human Resources for Health, writes in a SciDev.Net opinion piece. Dayrit discusses programs in Ethiopia, Sudan, and the Philippines that use community-based education and local service contracts to retain health care workers in areas where they are needed.

Center For Global Development Blog Responds To NPR Report On Health In Afghanistan

This post in the Center for Global Development’s (CGD) “Global Health Policy” blog, Amanda Glassman, director of global health policy and a research fellow at CGD, responds to an NPR Morning Edition report on USAID’s work in Afghanistan, recapping the progress the agency has made in improving health care in the country. However,…

Examining Military Sector’s Role In Global Health

In an article (.pdf) published in Global Health Governance, Derek Licina, an U.S. Army Medical Service Corps Officer, writes about the international military sector’s role in global health activities, which “has gained visibility in recent years.” He continues, “What is less clear is the overall contribution of the military sector to global health outcomes through direct and indirect investments.” He argues that focusing military global health efforts as outlined in international treaties, expanding existing multilateral military-related organizations, and establishing an international military global health financing mechanism will help “the military sector’s current role … become more efficient and effective in supporting the global good” (12/31).

Wall Street Journal Looks At European Efforts To Fight TB

The Wall Street Journal examines efforts to fight tuberculosis (TB) in Europe, writing, “All along the edges of Western Europe, new and hard-to-defeat strains of tuberculosis are gaining a foothold, often moving beyond traditional victims — alcoholics, drug users, HIV patients — and into the wider population.” The article focuses on the efforts of Estonia to turn the tide against multidrug-resistant TB, saying the country’s success “offers one of the few bright spots globally as the ancient plague mutates into new and more deadly forms.” The newspaper continues, “Indeed, experts say the country, with half the population of Chicago, could be a model for others. But there is one catch: It takes years and some pricey treatments just to gain the upper hand” (Naik, 12/31).

Humanitarian Conditions Deteriorating In CAR, Aid Groups Warn

“A rebel takeover of several key towns in the Central African Republic (CAR) has placed additional strain on humanitarian conditions that were already precarious due to years of armed conflict,” IRIN reports (1/4). “Humanitarian groups have expressed alarm at the lack of access to more than 300,000 civilians caught up in the fighting,” the Guardian notes, adding, “The U.N. secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon, and the [U.N.] security council have condemned the attacks and called on the rebels to halt hostilities” (Tran, 1/4). “In many areas, basic health care and education are provided by aid groups or not at all,” IRIN writes (1/4). “The Central African Republic has been wracked by political unrest since gaining independence from France in 1960,” the Guardian notes (1/4).

India, China Deny Claims Of Supplying Counterfeit Medications To Africa, Guardian Reports

“India has denied claims that it has exported large quantities of counterfeit medication to Africa, after the Guardian published a front-page exposé on the phenomenon,” the Guardian reports in a follow-up article. The original article “cited experts and NGO reports as saying that up to a third of anti-malarial drugs in Uganda and Tanzania might be fake or substandard, and the majority of them were manufactured in China and India,” the newspaper writes, adding, “The fake medications have led to deaths, prolonged illness and increased drug resistance in parts of east Africa, the article said.” According to the Guardian, “The Indian health ministry launched a huge campaign last month to check the quality of medication manufactured across the country.” In addition, “Chinese officials also denied the charges made in the report,” the newspaper notes, citing another article published on December 28 (Burke, 1/2).

Data Important For Global Health Policymaking

“Just like central bankers and ministers who need an accurate GDP figure for policymaking, health ministers need to know why their population is losing healthy life years,” Denizhan Duran, a research assistant at the Center for Global Development (CGD), writes in the group’s blog. The data in the Global Burden…

Somalia Aims To Provide Universal Basic Health Care By 2016

“Every Somali citizen will have access to basic health care by 2016 if a new, government-led strategic plan achieves its aims,” IRIN reports. The government launched the Health Sector Strategic Plans (HSSPs) for each of the country’s zones on March 21, marking “a move away from the emergency-level health provision that…

Financial Times Publishes Special Report On Sustainable Health Care

The Financial Times on Wednesday published a special report titled, “Sustainable Healthcare 2013.” Among others, the report includes an article examining the “need to put prevention before cure” to combat non-communicable diseases; an article examining alternative approaches to dealing with addiction and resulting health issues; and an article examining how…