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Global Health Conferences and Meetings

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RECENT RELEASE: Kaiser Family Foundation/JAMA Infographic Examines 30 Years Of HIV/AIDS

The Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) in partnership with the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has launched a new monthly infographic series, titled Visualizing Health Policy, which will provide visual snapshots of data that illuminate health policy issues, according to a KFF announcement (7/23). July’s Visualizing Health Policy looks at the state of the HIV/AIDS epidemic after three decades, and is published in the July 25 edition of JAMA, released at the XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C., the KFF website notes (7/23). The infographic includes global estimates of HIV prevalence, donor government funding for HIV/AIDS in developing countries, rates of new HIV diagnoses in the United States by race/ethnicity, and how the public’s perception of HIV/AIDS as the most urgent public health problem has diminished over time (7/23).

RECENT RELEASE: Kaiser Health News Interviews White House Senior Policy Advisor Ahead Of AIDS 2012

In this Kaiser Health News interview, KHN contributor Joanne Silberner talks with Gregg Millett, senior policy adviser in the Office of National AIDS Policy, ahead of the XIX International AIDS Conference. According to the transcript, Millett says “the president’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy has improved coordination among federal agencies and that the 2010 [Affordable Care Act] will improve access to care for those living with HIV/AIDS” (7/23). In related news, the White House on Saturday released five fact sheets covering HIV/AIDS prevention, HIV/AIDS treatment, the global AIDS epidemic, the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the U.S., and HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination (7/21).

OPINION: U.S. Should Reconsider Ban On Funding Needle-Exchange Programs

Noting that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s special cabinet committee on AIDS in 1986 “decided there should be clean needle exchanges for injecting drug users (IDUs) to prevent the spread of HIV,” Norman Fowler, a member of the British House of Lords and former British health secretary, writes in The Hill’s “Congress Blog,” There is no question that needle exchanges and drug substitution have reduced HIV: only two percent of new infections in Britain now come through that route.” In addition, “The policy has neither encouraged drug taking nor crime. Similar reports come from other nations that have adopted this approach,” he says, continuing, “Tragically, not all nations have followed such a lead,” including the U.S. and the Ukraine. Fowler adds, “If the U.S. was to reconsider [its recently reinstated] ban [on funding domestic and international needle exchanges] and recognize that without needle-exchange programs it is impossible to provide full protection from the spread of HIV and the death and suffering that goes with it, it would send a message around the world” (7/20).

RECENT RELEASE: Bill Gates Reflects On Event Recognizing World's Achievements Against AIDS

Noting the International AIDS Conference is being held in the U.S. for the first time in more than 20 years, Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, reflects on an event with “government leaders, philanthropists, faith leaders, entrepreneurs and entertainers at the Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theatre [Saturday] night to recognize what the world has achieved in turning the tide on AIDS,” in this post in the foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog. Gates says the event “offered a great stage to share success stories and talk about the importance of sustained HIV funding,” and concludes, “Americans can be justifiably proud of the tremendous moral leadership that the U.S. has taken in producing breakthrough innovations in the fight against HIV” (7/22).

International AIDS Conference Kicks Off In Washington, D.C.

The XIX International AIDS Conference opened in Washington, D.C., on Sunday and “is expected to draw 25,000 people, including politicians, scientists and activists, as well as some of the estimated 34 million people living with HIV who will tell their stories,” Agence France-Presse reports (Sheridan, 7/22). “Researchers, doctors and patients attending the world’s largest AIDS conference are urging the world’s governments not to cut back on the fight against the epidemic when it is at a turning point,” the Associated Press writes, adding, “There is no cure or vaccine yet, but scientists say they have the tools to finally stem the spread of this intractable virus — largely by using treatment not just to save patients but to make them less infectious, too” (Neergaard, 7/22). “New breakthroughs in research will be announced, as will new efforts by governments and organizations to reduce the spread of HIV, to treat those who have it, and to work, eventually, toward a vaccine and a cure,” the Seattle Times writes (Tate, 7/22). According to the Washington Post’s “Blog Post,” three remaining challenges to be addressed at the conference include: “More research into treatment and prevention, and more ways to deliver treatments”; reaching marginalized populations, such as men who have sex with men and sex workers; and “[i]ncreasing funding for PEPFAR and other anti-AIDS programs” (Khazan, 7/20).

International AIDS Conference A Call For Global Solidarity

Noting the 2010 reversal of the HIV travel and immigration ban allowing the International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) to be held in the U.S. for the first time in more than 20 years, Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.) writes in a Huffington Post Blog opinion piece, “It is so exciting to host this conference at such a pivotal time in the history of the AIDS response,” and adds, “At no other time in history has our global leadership been more important than it is right now.” With nearly 25,000 people from about 200 countries expected to gather in Washington, D.C., for the conference July 22-27, “These leaders in the global HIV and AIDS fight will showcase their incredible efforts and achievements on our own soil” and “have the opportunity to develop new solutions in addressing the ongoing challenges posed by HIV/AIDS in our own country and around the world,” Lee writes.

Recent Releases In Global Health

Blog: Global AIDS Coordinator Goosby Speaks About Uganda HIV Treatment  As part of a series in advance of AIDS 2010, the “Science Speaks” blog features an interview with U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Eric Goosby “about his expectations for the conference, what was behind the Uganda problem with shortages of AIDS medicine, and whether…

Opinions: Haitian Rebuilding; Nuclear State Vaccine Initiatives; HIV Rights Abuses In China; HIV Vaccine

Post-Earthquake Recovery In Haiti ‘Stalled’ The “paltry scale of the Pentagon’s reconstruction endeavor [in Haiti] – 1.6 million people displaced and the American military is contributing a few classrooms? — is emblematic of the international response,” columnist Dana Milbank writes in a Washington Post opinion piece. “Only 2 percent of promised reconstruction…

Recent Releases In Global Health

Ahead Of AIDS 2010, Lancet Issue Explores ARV Therapy, Gender Inequity Looking ahead to AIDS 2010 which will be held in Vienna, Austria, July 18-23, a Lancet editorial writes that 2010 marks “the deadline set by global leaders to achieve universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, and care. Sadly, the world…