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Global Fund, Nigeria Sign Agreements Worth $225M To Prevent, Treat Malaria

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the Nigerian government on Friday “signed two grant agreements … worth a total of $225 million to support programs that will prevent and treat malaria,” a Global Fund press release reports. According to the press release, the agreements “include an additional $50 million for bed nets, approved in an unusual move by the Global Fund Board that was linked to additional commitments by the government of Nigeria” (8/24). Global Fund Deputy Executive Director Debrework Zewdie “told top government functionaries that the [money] is meant to assure the international community that Nigeria is a worthy partner in the fight to eradicate malaria,” ThisDay writes, adding, “During a transformation of the fund’s grant management structure this year, Nigeria was identified as one of the 20 ‘high impact’ countries that are now receiving special attention” (8/26). Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede, CEO of Access Bank and chair of the Friends of the Global Fund Africa, “described the grant as [an] opportunity for Nigeria to show leadership and commitment in the fight against malaria by committing more resources to save lives,” the Daily Trust notes (Atonko, 8/26).

Blog Examines Use Of Controversial HIV Drug In Malawi

This post in the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog examines the use of stavudine, “also known as d4T, an antiretroviral treatment that was dropped in wealthy countries years ago and that the World Health Organization has recommended stop being included in treatment programs,” to treat HIV in Malawi. “[W]hile children and pregnant or breastfeeding women, as well as tuberculosis patients have access to less toxic treatments, stavudine continues to be the first treatment supplied to most Malawi patients under the terms of the country’s grant from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria,” the blog writes, adding, “In a letter [.pdf] to Global Fund General Manager Gabriel Jaramillo and [U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador] Eric Goosby, the Centre for Development of People (CEDEP), Health GAP (Global Access Project), and the Malawi Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (MANET+) are asking the Global Fund to find a way to switch to first line treatment in Malawi that is acceptable to patients and World Health Organization standards” (8/15).

Aidspan Publishes New Issue Of 'Global Fund Observer'

Aidspan, an independent watchdog of the Global Fund, on Wednesday published Issue 192 of its “Global Fund Observer.” The issue features an article examining new reports released by the Office of the Inspector General on three audits and four diagnostic reviews; an article highlighting two reports on the impact of the cancellation of Round 11 by the Global Fund; and an article discussing the reaction to Spain’s Global Fund contribution, among others (8/15).

CSIS Report Examines HIV Prevention, Care Among People Who Inject Drugs In Ukraine

A new report, titled “Injection Drug Use in Ukraine” and published by the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS), examines the challenges of providing HIV prevention and care services in the country, particularly to people who inject drugs (PWID), who accounted for “nearly 50 percent of new HIV infections registered in 2010,” according to the CSIS website. Authors Phillip Nieburg, senior associate and co-chair of the Prevention Committee of the CSIS HIV/AIDS Task Force, and Lisa Carty, senior adviser in the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, also examine how the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and PEPFAR could help Ukraine “in advancing HIV prevention and other services for PWID,” the website notes (3/16).

Swazi, South African Activists March To U.S. Consulate In Johannesburg To Call For Emergency Global Fund Meeting

“Almost a thousand Swazi and South African HIV activists marched to the United States consulate in Johannesburg on [Thursday] to demand that the U.S. continue supporting the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis (TB) and Malaria, and safeguard funding of its President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR),” PlusNews reports. “The march organizers — a coalition of international and regional HIV organizations, including the global medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), the World AIDS Campaign, and the AIDS Rights Alliance Southern Africa — also called on the British and Australian governments to join their American counterparts in kick-starting a response to solve the Global Fund’s financial crisis,” according to the news service.

NGOs Release Joint Statement Calling For Governments To Increase Payments To Global Fund To Fill Gap In TB Funding

Ahead of World Tuberculosis (TB) Day on March 24, three non-governmental organizations (NGOs) released a joint statement warning that “[a] $1.7 billion funding shortfall to fight [TB] over the next five years means 3.4 million patients will go untreated and gains made against the disease will be reversed,” Reuters reports. The International HIV/AIDS Alliance, the Stop AIDS Campaign and Results UK said in the statement that the cancellation of Round 11 grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was endangering the expansion of treatment and prevention programs, the news agency notes. The statement “called on governments to scale up funding of TB, HIV and malaria programs at a G20 meeting in Mexico in June in an effort to replenish the Global Fund with $2 billion,” according to Reuters (Mollins, 3/23).

Global Fund Donors ‘Earmark’ Funds For Capacity-Building, Fund’s General Manager Says

Gabriel Jaramillo, the general manager of the Geneva-based Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, said in an interview on Friday that “quite a few donors” to the fund “have earmarked portions of their donations to us, their contributions, to capacity-building,” the Associated Press/Washington Post reports. According to the AP, the Global Fund “is increasingly being forced to devote a portion of its donations to improving its own spending controls rather than disease-fighting,” the news service writes. “France, whose nearly $2.9 billion in donations have made it the fund’s second-largest contributor after the U.S., will sign a new pledging agreement this month requiring that five percent of its money go to tighten financial accountability among grant recipients, he said,” the AP writes.

Ukraine Security Secretary Says HIV, TB Remain Threat To Nation’s Security, Encourages Cooperation With Global Fund

Speaking about two bills concerning Ukraine’s cooperation with the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, Ukraine Secretary of National Security and Defense Council Andriy Kliuyev said “[t]he epidemics of AIDS and tuberculosis [TB] remain a threat to national security in Ukraine and require redoubled efforts to treat and prevent these diseases,” Interfax reports. Submitted to Ukraine’s parliament by the Cabinet of Ministers, the two bills “propos[e] to exempt from taxes and duties all transactions connected with the use of grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in Ukraine,” the news agency notes. “The NSDC secretary said the state should explore every avenue to minimize the sickness rate and create conditions for the treatment and prevention of dangerous diseases, adding that the grants of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria are valuable support for Ukraine,” Interfax writes (3/3).

Chevron Recognized As First ‘Global Fund Corporate Champion,’ VOA News Reports

VOA News reports on a March 20 panel meeting in Washington, D.C., that highlighted the contributions of corporations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Chevron, which has “invested $30 million for the three-year period between 2008 and 2011 and has pledged another $25 million through 2013,” was recognized at the meeting as “the first Global Fund Corporate Champion,” according to VOA (DeCapua, 3/23).

Study Examines TB Services In Prisons In Countries Receiving Global Fund Grants

According to a study recently published in a special supplement of the Journal of Infectious Diseases, half of countries receiving grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria provide tuberculosis (TB) services in prisons; “even when TB services were provided to prisoners, they were limited in scope; and “[f]ew of the programs receiving a grant from the Global Fund offered services dedicated to the treatment and prevention of multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB),” an aidsmap news story reports. TB is a leading cause of death among incarcerated individuals worldwide, aidsmap notes. The study authors concluded, “There is an urgent need to better understand the financing needs and cost-effective service delivery models for tuberculosis care in prisons,” according to the story (Carter, 3/30).