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Simple Strategies Can Make Big Difference In Maternal Mortality

Aissata Sall Yade, a communications assistant for the Senegal Urban Reproductive Health Initiative, part of IntraHealth International, writes in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog about Aissatou Dia Fall, a head midwife at Senegal’s Gallo Dia Health Center in Yeumbeul, and her efforts to improve access to health care for women in the community. She has reached out to different organizations for monetary assistance for her clients, Yade notes, adding, “Strategies like Aissatou Dia Fall’s will help improve Senegal’s national contraceptive prevalence rate, which is currently only 12 percent. It will also help reduce one of the world’s highest maternal mortality rates (410 deaths per 100,000 live births) and reduce the fertility rate (an average of five children per woman)” (10/17).

Gates Foundation Blog Posts Recognize World Contraception Day

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog, in partnership with Women Deliver, on Friday published two posts on youth perspectives to celebrate World Contraception Day, observed annually on September 26. In the first post, Wanzala Martin, a social worker and co-founder of Allied Youth Initiative-Uganda, writes about access to contraceptives and sexual and reproductive health for young people with disabilities, saying, “The health of youth with disabilities is a human rights issue and is a fundamental pillar for progress on Africa’s road to achieving the Millennium Development Goals by 2015” (9/14). In the second post, Aiste Dackauskaite, an advocacy project coordinator at the Lithuanian Family Planning and Sexual Health Association, writes about barriers to and myths about contraceptives in Lithuania, which has the lowest levels of contraceptive use in Europe (9/14).

Bill Gates Describes How 'Catalytic Philanthropy' Can Help Bring Vaccines, Medicines To Untouched Markets

In an essay adapted for Forbes magazine from a speech given at the Forbes 400 Summit on Philanthropy in June, Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, discusses how “[i]nnovations for the poor suffer from … market limitations” and his idea of “catalytic philanthropy.” Gates writes, “The market is not going to place huge bets on research when there are no buyers for a breakthrough. This explains why we have no vaccine for malaria today, even though a million people die from it every year.” Therefore, “when you come to the end of the innovations that business and government are willing to invest in, you still find a vast, unexplored space of innovation where the returns can be fantastic,” he continues.

Blog Examines Importance Of Access To Family Planning Information, Contraceptives For Young People

“Young or old, family planning should be a simple and personal decision made by informed individuals or couples regarding how often and when to have children,” Anne Alan Sizomu, the advocacy officer for Deutsche Stiftung Weltbevoelkerung’s (DSW) Uganda country office, writes in this post in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog, published in partnership with Women Deliver as part of a series on youth perspectives to recognize World Contraception Day, observed annually on September 26. “In order to make informed decisions regarding their future, it is important for young people to have access to timely information and contraceptives,” she continues, adding, “Young people need to demand their reproductive health rights — including access to contraceptives and the ability to decide when to have children” (9/17).

Al Jazeera Program Interviews Bill And Melinda Gates

On a recent episode of “Talk To Al Jazeera,” the news agency’s Alan Fisher interviews Bill and Melinda Gates, co-chairs of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, about their work. “The foundation concentrates its efforts in health, education and agriculture in both the developing and the developed world,” Al Jazeera writes, adding, “Inevitably it draws criticism because of what it does and how it does it — yet each year it spends billions of dollars trying to live up to its mission to help all people lead healthy and productive lives.” In the interview, the Gateses discuss their motivations for founding the organization, respond to criticism of their work, and talk about their visions and ambitions for the future (9/2).

Gates Foundation Blog Examines Efforts To Stop Mother-To-Child Syphilis Transmission

In this post in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog, Gary Darmstadt, head of the Family Health Division of the foundation, Wendy Prosser, a research analyst with the Family Health Division, and Damian Walker, a senior program officer at the foundation, examine efforts to stop the transmission of syphilis from mother to child during labor and delivery. “[W]e have been depending on doing only one thing to eliminate the transmission of syphilis from a mom to her baby, and doing it for years: antenatal care,” they write. However, “eliminating congenital syphilis only through screening of pregnant women — is not working,” the authors state, and discuss “other innovative ideas that need exploration,” including the development of a vaccine (9/13).

Blog Examines Access To Contraceptive Information, Services Among Young People

In this post in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog, published in partnership with Women Deliver as part of a series on youth perspectives to recognize World Contraception Day, observed annually on September 26, youth activist Cecilia Garcia Ruiz writes, “For six years we’ve worked to shine a spotlight on these key issues, but some people still disregard the importance of providing universal access to quality contraceptive services and information to prevent unplanned pregnancies, especially among young people.” She discusses barriers to accessing contraceptive methods and information, and continues, “These problems not only undermine our well-being, but also hinder our possibilities to develop our full potential. Therefore, young people’s access to contraceptive information and services becomes a human rights issue” (9/13).

Old Anti-Inflammatory Drug Possible Candidate To Treat TB

After testing about 5,600 existing medications for their effectiveness against drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis (TB), researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College reported this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that oxyphenbutazone, “an anti-inflammatory medication marketed in the 1950s as Tandearil and still used in veterinary medicine,” killed both latent and active TB bacteria in test-tube experiments, the Los Angeles Times’ “Booster Shots” blog reports. The medication is inexpensive, estimated to cost two cents per day in developing countries, according to the researchers, but it needs to go through “a series of clinical trials in which researchers would flesh out, in a human population, the medication’s safety and effectiveness record at various doses, in different patient populations and at different stages of the disease,” the blog writes.

Gates Blog Series On World Contraception Day

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog continues its series, published in partnership with Women Deliver, to recognize World Contraception Day, observed annually on September 26. The following pieces were published recently:

Gates Foundation Blog Posts Recognize World Contraception Day

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog, in partnership with Women Deliver, on Wednesday published two posts on youth perspectives to celebrate World Contraception Day, observed annually on September 26. In the first, Yemurai Nyoni, a 22 year old youth advocate for sexual and reproductive health from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, writes, “[A]s a young person living in Africa, it is often difficult for us to realize our sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially when it comes to family planning,” adding, “As we celebrate World Contraception Day, I call upon African leaders to engage their conscience, apply adequate reason, and take urgent actions to facilitate increased access to and utilization of family planning services by sexually active young people” (9/12). In the second, Janna Oberdorf, a journalist and communications specialist at Women Deliver, writes, “Young people have the right to access accurate and unbiased information about contraception and safe sex, which they need to prevent unwanted pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and improve their lives in a number of ways. … Access to quality health services and supplies and accurate information is a basic right, and young people around the world are beginning to mobilize” (9/12).